Sanjha Morcha

Amazing Light and Sound Show ::BATTLE OF SARAGARHI ::01 DEC2018 FROM 1800 TO 1930Hrs opp CM Punjab Residence

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The battle of Saragarhi: When 21 Sikh soldiers of 36 Sikh Regiment stood against 10,000 ( Afghani)  Afiridi tribesmen men to safe Guard Saraghari Fort  on 12 Sep 1897.

The frontier between colonial India and Afghanistan in the 19th century was a place of danger and unrest. In 1897, at a small outpost called Saragarhi, 40 miles away from the British garrison town of Kohat (in what is now Pakistan), 21 Sikh soldiers stood their ground against an onslaught of 10,000 enemy tribesmen. Their gallantry in fighting to the bitter end cemented their reputation as brave and devoted to their duty, and the soldiers were recognised by the British with memorials, a battle honour and a regimental holiday. So why was Saragarhi viewed with such significance, and how is it still relevant today?

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Four soliders of the 36th Sikhs, various ranks, 1896. The regiment was led in January 1897 to occupy the Samana posts, says Captain Jay Singh-Sohal. (Reproduced with permission from australiansikhheritage.com)
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Signaller Gurmukh Singh used a heliograph to message an account of events at Saragarhi, though he did not pick up any incoming messages from Fort Gulistan. (© DHP)
Signaller Gurmukh Singh used a heliograph to message an account of events at Saragarhi, though he did not pick up any incoming messages from Fort Gulistan.
The remains of the piquet at Saragarhi. (© Charles Eve)

The heliograph, the reason why the men fought to defend Saragarhi, would ironically be the source of their fame: details of their heroism were heliographed and then telegraphed back to London by a Timescorrespondent and then reported in newspapers around the world. The commander-in-chief of India recorded his “admiration of the heroism shown by those gallant soldiers”.

The British saw the significance of this last stand in inspiring more Indians to serve and fight, and built two Memorial Gurdwaras: one near Sri Harimandir Sahib (Golden Temple), Amritsar, and another in Ferozepur. The 36th Sikhs were duly rewarded a battle honour for the Samana and 12 September was set as a regimental holiday.

The unveiling of the Saragarhi memorial at Amritsar in 1902. (Credit DHP)
The unveiling of the Saragarhi memorial at Amritsar in 1902. (Credit DHP)

This commemoration continues to be marked in India by the descendant 4 Sikh Regiment while the chief minister of Punjab, Captain Amarinder Singh, has recently invoked a Punjab-wide holiday for the battle on 12 September.

Gallant soldiers’ of 36 Sikh Regiment who attained Martyrdom at Saragari Fort/
Havildar Ishar Singh (regimental number 165)
Naik Lal Singh (332)
Lance Naik Chanda Singh (546)
Sepoy Sundar Singh (1321)
Sepoy Ram Singh (287)
Sepoy Uttar Singh (492)
Sepoy Sahib Singh (182)
Sepoy Hira Singh (359)
Sepoy Daya Singh (687)
Sepoy Jivan Singh (760)
Sepoy Bhola Singh (791)
Sepoy Narayan Singh (834)
Sepoy Gurmukh Singh (814)
Sepoy Jivan Singh (871)
Sepoy Gurmukh Singh (1733)
Sepoy Ram Singh (163)
Sepoy Bhagwan Singh (1257)
Sepoy Bhagwan Singh (1265)
Sepoy Buta Singh (1556)
Sepoy Jivan Singh (1651)
Sepoy Nand Singh (1221)

Haryana govt offers land for armed forces’ prep institute Zoom

Making efforts to increase state’s contribution towards army: CM

From page 1 CHANDIGARH: Haryana chief minister (CM) Manohar Lal Khattar. on Thursday, said that his government is making efforts to increase the state’s contribution towards the armed forces from the present 9% to over 10%.

HT■ General officer Commanding­in­Chief, Western Command, Lt Gen Surinder Singh felicitating Haryana CM Manohar Lal Khattar during the civil­military liaison conference in Chandigarh on Thursday.

“The Khanda village panchayat in Sonepat district had recently offered 50 acre to the army for setting up of an Armed Forces’ Preparatory Institute in the state,” Khattar said.

The Haryana CM was speaking at the civil-military liaison conference here, in which General Officer Commanding-inChief (GOC-in-C), Western Command, Lt Gen Surinder Singh, chief of staff Western Command, PM Bali and other senior officers were present.

Talking about the conference, he said that this was the fourth such annual conference being organised during the regime of their government. “This event provides a common platform to discuss and resolve issues between the army and civil administration,” he said. During the conference, it was decided that a memorandum of understanding (MoU) will be signed between the Western Command and the state government for making provisions of civil medical facilities for armed forces in case of war or duties.

ARMY COLLEGE TO BE SET UP

Khattar added that a general degree college of army would be set up at Bataur village in Panchkula district for which, the state government will provide 10 acre to the Western Command for free. Lt General Surinder Singh said that a certain percentage of seats in this college will be reserved for the wards of civilians.

It was further added that the army had approved a proposal for setting up of the army college in Jind district in memory of Major Sanjeev Lather, who hailed from Jind district and had attained martyrdom in November, 2016 in a chopper crash in West Bengal’s Sukhna.


Let’s be realistic about Imran Khan

Pakistan PM’s intentions are unclear and don’t matter. His limitations do, and these are clear

Imran Khan is right to say a war between India and Pakistan is unlikely as no nuclear power would lose. It doesn’t, however, mean that peace is about to break out. It also depends on what kind of war we are talking about. War and peace between enemies who’ve fought four wars on various scales in seven decades, continue a low-intensity conflict through most of these, and have existential fears about each other is too serious and complex an issue to be analysed in terms of events and speeches. Analysts — peaceniks and warmongers — on both sides have made that error often enough in the past.

I am no exception. Over the 33 years since my first reporting visit to Pakistan (summer of 1985, to cover the trial of Sikh hijackers of an Indian Airlines plane), I have over-read the situation more than once, on the positive and the negative side. That, despite the fact that I have probably spent more time in Pakistan as a journalist than most in Indian media.

It takes you time — and patience — to appreciate the many unresolved ideological and political issues underlying our hostility. It is fashionable but juvenile to make comparisons with France and Germany. Imran is only the latest to use it, not the first. Nothing can be lazier. Neither France nor Germany was born by a division of the other. They fought many wars, but one was defeated with finality. Europe spent decades dismantling its toxic nationalism. There was America as the Big Daddy supervising this, and guaranteeing Western Europe protection. To put it brutally: That peace wasn’t reached because good sense descended on both sides. It is because one was defeated, devastated, divided and occupied by the world’s biggest powers. The first and the last opportunity for India-Pakistan peace was the Simla Agreement. We know who was insincere from the moment the agreement was signed.

This is precisely when Zulfikar Ali Bhutto (an elected, civilian leader with the vanquished Army deflated) launched Pakistan on to the path of pan-Islamisation and nuclearisation. He dissed that great Simla opportunity for permanent peace as a humiliating Treaty of Versailles and began preparing for a “thousand-year war” (his early 1970s boast, repeated about two decades later by his daughter as prime minister). Bhutto Senior wanted it to be a war Pakistan would never lose again. Hence the nukes.

That’s the reason Imran Khan can stand at a solemn religious celebration and remind the much bigger India that its conventional military power amounts to nothing.

Bhutto founded this post-1971 strategic doctrine. Let’s call it the ‘we-shall-neverlose-another-war to India’ doctrine. We could argue that Pakistan lost in Kargil. But the nukes closed India’s options. Or a provocation like that would have invited a full military response.

By the time Bhutto was done re-toxifying his country, his Army was set to reclaim power. It has gone through challenges, particularly from two full-majority governments under Nawaz Sharif. But now the template is set. An elected government is allowed as an optical necessity. Foreign, strategic, India-US-China policies, control of the nukes, temperature in Kashmir, Afghanistan are all out of the syllabus for elected governments.

In their own different ways, both Benazir Bhutto and Nawaz Sharif challenged it. One paid for it with prison, exile and life. The other with prison more than once, even with key family members, exile and disenfranchisement. Imran won’t make a pretence. Since Zia’s assassination and the return of some democracy, his is the first government elected and set up entirely with the institutional Army patronage. His party is truly the King’s Party in Pakistan’s politics. To ensure his election, the guy most likely to win was barred from contesting, campaigning, jailed with his daughter and son-in-law. The numbers Imran still fell short of were “arranged” overnight. Of course, his patrons were humane enough to free his rivals once the mission was accomplished. Imran isn’t about to make the blunder of his predecessors, and challenge the fauji-democracy template of divided powers. Or what an exasperated Nawaz Sharif described to me once as “aadha teetar, aadha bater” (half a partridge, half a quail).

Don’t be judgemental about Imran. Be realistic. On my first visit to Pakistan, eminent Pakistani lawyer, politician and activist, Aitzaz Ahsan, had described Zia’s partyless Muhammad Khan Junejo government as “bonsai democracy”. Pretty to look from outside, but never allowed to grow roots and branches outside of its little shelf-space.

Over the decades, Pakistan has cemented that template. One who challenges it, goes to jail, exile, death or all three. Imran Khan is smart. In all evidence so far, he’s Pakistan’s first volunteer bonsai. His intentions are unclear and don’t matter. His limitations do, and these are clear.

That’s the fundamental reality to remember before we get breathless over a gesture, an event, a speech, a pilgrimage.

Well begun but far from done

Kartarpur corridor is welcome, but let’s see how far it takes us

The inauguration of the Kartarpur corridor is a positive step, but whether this could be the means to the end called peace between India and Pakistan, remains an open question. Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan used an interaction with a visiting group of Indian journalists to say that it wasn’t in Pakistan’s interest to allow its soil to be used for terrorism against others. But the history of the relationship between India and Pakistan has been that of one step forward and two steps back. The first challenge is to sustain and keep the idea of the corridor alive beyond 2019, the year that coincides with the 550th birth anniversary of Sikh guru Baba Nanak Dev.

The concern among sceptics that India will not be able to control security in the 4.5-kilometre corridor doesn’t appear to be too insurmountable a challenge. Also, the chances that the opening of the corridor may lead to the revival of the Khalistan movement appear to be remote, because of a few significant reasons. One, a lot of water has flown down the Beas since the height of the Khalistan movement of the 1980s. The change is clear from the fact that the Congress government is in power in the border state again. Second, in terms of history, Pakistan has never had any claim on Punjab, unlike Kashmir, which remains an unresolved territorial dispute.

Having said this, the threat on account of Pakistan’s history has not gone away overnight. There is a strong possibility that our neighbour will stop exporting terror from its territory to India, in violation of the MoU signed in 2004 between Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf and former Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee. At the inauguration, Mr Khan said the Army and the PM were on the same page when it came to ties with India. While this is good news for Mr Khan, the more important requirement is for India and Pakistan to be on the same page in fighting terror. Only then can momentum be built for the popular support that is a prerequisite for any peace effort. At present, the mood in India is not in favour of a dialogue with Pakistan. With India set to go in for elections in 2019, Mr Khan’s gesture, although well meaning, appears to have come at the wrong time.


November deadliest month for rebels in J&K with 37 deaths

Officials say the spate of militant killings have led to a sharp fall in LeT cadres

SRINAGAR: With the killing of 37 militants in different encounters across Kashmir, November has been the deadliest month for the rebels. Among the nine top militant commanders killed this month, five were affiliated with the Hizbul Mujahideen and four with the Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT).

LeT’s Naveed Jatt, the prime suspect in the murder of journalist Shujaat Bukhari, was killed on Wednesday in Budgam.

According to figures, 227 militants have been killed in different parts of Kashmir until November 29 this year. LeT and the Hizbul Mujahideen have suffered the maximum fatalities in 2018, losing a combined 207 militants.

Officials admit that the focus in recent times has been to target militant commanders who play a role in recruitment. J&K’s DGP, Dilbag Singh, said nearly 250 militants operate in the state. “After several successful operations, the graph of militancy, especially in south Kashmir, has come down,’’ he said. A senior police officer, who requested anonymity, said more than 15 top militant commanders affiliated with the Jaish-e-Mohammed, Lashkar-eTaiba, Hizbul Mujahideen, Harkat-ul-Mujahideen and Ansar Gazwat-ul-Hind were killed in different operations in 2018. “Even militant modules helping commanders and several hideouts were busted,’’ he said.

The officer, however, said now only three or four prominent top commanders are active, including Hizbul Mujahideen operational commander Riyaz Naikoo, Al-Badr commander Zeenat-ul Islam, Lateef Tiger, who was an associate of late Hizbul commander Burhan Wani, and Zakir Musa, chief of the Ansar Gazwatul-Hind. “The killings of several top militants has put the commanders under tremendous pressure,’’ the officer said.

The spate of militant killings, officials said, has led to a fall in the number of Lashkar-e-Taiba cadres, which was earlier between 120-150. Officials say at least 100 Lashkar-e-Taiba militants are still active. This year, at least 46 militants were killed on the Line of Control while trying to sneak into the Valley.

Officials cited several reasons for the successful operations in south Kashmir, especially in the last three months.

“The intelligence network, flow of information both from (various) sources and shifting of the militants from forests to populated areas in the month of November are the reasons for the killing of militants,’’ an officer deployed in south Kashmir, a hotbed of militancy, said on condition of anonymity .

A surge in militant fatalities is noticed usually in the months of October and November, when militants shift base. Last year, in the two months, 44 militants were killed; in the past two months, the tally has already reached 63.


Be Prepared To Meet Security Challenges In Kashmir: Army Commander

The Army commander complimented troops for their remarkable successes in eliminating terrorist leadership from south and central Kashmir, spokesperson said.

Be Prepared To Meet Security Challenges In Kashmir: Army Commander

Lt Genral Ranbir Singh reviewing the security situation in Kashmir.

 

SRINAGAR: The Army’s Northern Command chief Lt Gen Ranbir Singh reviewed the security situation in Kashmir and was briefed about the recent anti-terrorist operations in the valley, a defence spokesman said today.

The Northern Army Commander arrived in Kashmir Valley on Thursday to review the prevailing security situation, the spokesman said. “Accompanied by the Chinar Corps Commander Lt Gen AK Bhatt, the Army commander visited units in south Kashmir and was briefed by commanders on the ground about the current situation and recent counter terrorist operations,” the spokesman said.

He said the Army commander complimented troops for their remarkable successes in eliminating terrorist leadership from south and central Kashmir.

Lt Gen Singh also commended them for their dedication to duty and high standards of professionalism and was appreciative of measures and Standard Operating Procedures instituted by units and formations to minimise civilian causalities.

COMMENT

“The need to be prepared for meeting security challenges effectively was also reinforced. Lauding the excellent synergy amongst all security forces, he exhorted all ranks to maintain a safe, secure and peaceful environment for the people of the Kashmir,” the spokesman said.


HAL CEO says Rafale deal negotiations with Dassault Aviation went south due to disagreements over technology transfer

Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL) CEO R Madhavan in an interview answered questions over the Rafale deal negotiations with Dassault Aviation, saying that the deal breaker was because of disagreement over technology transfer and that HAL man hour rates are lower than global rates. The CEO also asserted that the focus must be on the final cost.

The clarifications came from the CEO after BJP minister Babul Supriyo on 27 September had indicated that HAL lost on the Rafale deal because it quoted 2.57 times more man-hours to build fighter jets. In an interview with CNN-News18, Madhavan also said that HAL is not actively looking for any offset business offers and said that “we work in offset business if it is in our domain.”

Madhavan had further stated that HAL is primarily engaged in manufacturing aircraft and it has technology transfer agreement with foreign original equipment manufacturer (OEM) but as far as offset is concerned, “we are not going to actively pursue offset deal.”

Image of chairman of defence PSU Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) - R Madhavan. ANI

While talking about the deal with Dassault, he said that first quote by the French aviation firm was 170 percent higher.

HAL was to produce 108 fighter jets locally in a joint venture with French firm Dassault Aviation in the deal for 126 Rafale jets that the previous UPA regime had negotiated. The state-owned firm, however, was left out in the deal as the present government signed to buy 36 fighter jets in ‘fly-away’ condition from France, reported PTI.

In an interview with news agency ANIDassault CEO Eric Trappier was questioned about the initial agreement with HAL and the subsequent breakdown of talks with the Indian PSU for production of Rafale jets. Trappier had said that if the initial deal of 126 jets went through they would not have hesitated to work with HAL and Mukesh Ambani-led Reliance.

“It’s because the 126 didn’t go smooth that the Government of India had to reconfigure to urgently acquire 36 from France. And then I took the decision to continue with Reliance, and HAL even said in the last few days that they were not interested to be part of the offset. So, it has been done by my decision and the decision of Reliance to invest in a new private company,” added Trappier.


Defence ministry denies medical facilities to retired short-service commission officers

NEW DELHI: In a blow to short-service commission (SSC) officers of the armed forces, the government seems to have backtracked on a promise to provide them post-retirement medical benefits, with the defence ministry putting it in writing that this would not be possible due to “stressed” resources.

SSC officers serve for limited tenures of up to 14 years at a young age to meet a shortage faced by the servicesNSE 0.97 %, with the idea being that a greater proportion of the officer cadre wo ..

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Demography Of Entire PoK Completely Changed By Pak, Reveals Army Chief

“Pakistan has very cleverly changed the complete demography of so-called Pakistan-occupied Kashmir, Gilgit-Baltistan. So, one is not very sure as to who is an actual Kashmiri, whom we are addressing these issues to,” he said.

Demography Of Entire PoK Completely Changed By Pak, Reveals Army Chief

Army Chief General Bipin Rawat said the demography of “other side of LoC” has been changed by Pakistan

NEW DELHI: 

Army Chief General Bipin Rawat said on Wednesday that Pakistan has very cleverly changed the complete demography of Pakistan-occupied Kashmir (PoK) including Gilgit-Baltistan while adding that the identity of Kashmiris on the other side of the Line of Control has systematically been eroded by Islamabad.

Delivering the Yashwantrao Chavan Memorial Lecture in Delhi on Wednesday, the army chief said, “Every time something happens on our side (of LoC), we must always address it to say that it is also going to have a radical effect on other side (PoK). The issue is, on the other side, the complete demography has changed.”

“Pakistan has very cleverly changed the complete demography of so-called Pakistan-occupied Kashmir, Gilgit-Baltistan. So, one is not very sure as to who is an actual Kashmiri, whom we are addressing these issues to,” he said.

General Rawat further said, “People from Gilgit-Baltistan (part of PoK) are also now being taken over gradually (by Islamabad). So, to say that there is an identity between our side (of LoC) of Kashmir and the other side, then the identity thing has gradually been eroded very cleverly by the Pakistanis. That is an issue we have to look at.”

The army chief said that the tolerance levels of the people in Jammu and Kashmir have “reduced and perceived alienation” as the youth in the region are being “indoctrinated to act irrationally.”

“In recent times, the tolerance levels of the public in Kashmir have reduced and perceived alienation is indicative of a definitive aspirational deficit amongst the local youth. The Kashmiri youth is being indoctrinated to act irrationally. The proliferation of social media has further compounded the challenge and contributes towards the spread of an anti-establishment narrative,” he highlighted.

General Rawat said, “Perceptions in Jammu and Kashmir is based on whose story you are listening to. Thus, making peace narrative is very different. These narratives are built around the constructs of radicalisation, alienation, agitation, religious fundamentalism and anti-nationalism on one hand and the perception of a Kashmiri common man on the other.”

Talking about the state, the army chief said, “Things will be brought under control and are being brought under control, but sustained pressure needs to be maintained.”

General Rawat also expressed concern over allowing funeral processions of terrorists. He said that those who are glorifying terrorists as brave hearts are “possibly trying encouraging more people to join the terrorist ranks.”

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The army chief’s comments come after two Central Reserve Police Force or CRPF jawans sustained injuries on Wednesday in a stone-pelting incident in Jammu and Kashmir’s Budgam district. A group of people had resorted to stone pelting during an ongoing encounter between the security forces and the terrorists in Chathergram village.


Army commander reviews security situation in Kashmir

Srinagar, November 30

Army’s Northern Command chief Lt Gen Ranbir Singh reviewed the security situation in Kashmir and was briefed about the recent anti-militancy operations in the Valley, a defence spokesman said on Friday.

The Northern Army Commander arrived in the Kashmir Valley on Thursday to review the prevailing security situation, the spokesman said.“Accompanied by Chinar Corps Commander Lt Gen AK Bhatt, the Army commander visited units in south Kashmir and was briefed by commanders on the ground about the current situation and recent counter-terrorist operations,” the spokesman said.

He said the Army commander complimented troops for their remarkable successes in eliminating militant leadership from south and central Kashmir.Lt Gen Singh also commended them for their dedication to duty and high standards of professionalism and was appreciative of measures and Standard Operating Procedures instituted by units and formations to minimise civilian causalities.

“The need to be prepared for meeting security challenges effectively was also reinforced. Lauding the excellent synergy amongst all security forces, he exhorted all ranks to maintain a safe, secure and peaceful environment for the people of Kashmir,” the spokesman said. PTI


CM: More than 10% Army intake our aim

CM: More than 10% Army intake our aim

Lt Gen Surinder Singh, General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Western Command, presents Manohar Khattar Lal, Chief Minister, with a memento in Chandigarh on Thursday. Tribune photo

ibune News Service

Chandigarh November 29

Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar said though there has been a sizeable intake of officers into the armed forces from Haryana, efforts are being made to increase it beyond the 10 per cent mark.

Khattar was addressing the Civil Military Liaison Conference here today. General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Western Command, Lt General Surinder Singh, other senior government officials and Army officers also attended the conference.

While describing Haryana as the state of ‘jawan and kisan’, the CM said at present, the intake of officers into the armed forces from the state is over nine per cent, but we want to take it to over 10 per cent. Recently, the Khanda village panchayat in Sonepat district has given 50 acres for the setting up of an armed forces preparatory institute, he said.

Khattar said the state government has so far provided jobs to 252 dependents of the martyrs. It is the first time that dependents of martyrs of the 1962 and 1971 wars are also being provided government jobs.

It was informed that a General Degree College of Army would come up at village Bataur village, Barwala, Panchkula, for which the government had allotted 10 acres to the Western Command headquarters