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    A civilian CONTRIBUTE FOR NOBLE CAUSE: DONATIONS FOR DEBT RIDDEN officers daughters but NoN from Veterans officers

    Uappeal1A very Strange to know that a Civilian from Vishakapatnam deposited a sum of RS 5000/- each in the accounts of the needy and financially helpless Girls but till date non of the Veterans have done anything except exchanding whats app message in groups.

     If we veterans officers cannot even contribute Rs 10000/- but all ready to except donations for their organisation needs to be reviewed. There is need to change our approach and attitude . WE all talk about Govt not taking care of ESM,Widows and their children but not ready to Spare few thousands being officer Veterans. photo (2)

    Sanjha Morcha Salute Mr Satish Kumar for depositing amount .The Girls donot have any sorce of Income or anyone to support them to Fight Legal Case against their Bio-logical nor any documents about their father or confirmed address. Father. Deposit slips of the amount IMG-20180516-WA0037

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    The Late Maternal Grand father of the Girls was an Arjuna Awardee and VSM Recipient from EME ,Major Sarabjit Singh in 1962 .IMG_20180505_110211 (1)

     

     

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    Uappeal1


    The Kishanganga imbroglio by b Lt-Gen Pramod Grover (retd)

    The Kishanganga Hydroelectric Project is likely to be inaugurated by the PM today. The project was completed 30 years after its conception. Lessons need to be drawn from Pakistan’s obstructionist attitude despite India’s benevolence in sharing of Indus river waters.

    The Kishanganga imbroglio

    Kishanganga Hydroelectric Power Project Dam site in Gurez valley of Bandipora district in north Kashmir. Tribune photo

    Lt-Gen Pramod Grover (retd)

    Widely accepted as one of the most sophisticated and comprehensive international water treaties, the Indus Waters Treaty stands out as the world’s most generous water-sharing arrangement by far, in terms of both the sharing ratio (80.52 per cent of the aggregate water flows in the Indus system reserved for Pakistan) and the total volume of basin waters for the downstream state. Even the US Senate Foreign Relations Committee Report (2011) refers to this pact as “the world’s most successful water treaty”.The implementation of the provisions of the treaty, however, has not been without intractable divergences and consistent tension between the two parties. Despite India’s generosity in the sharing of the Indus river waters, Pakistan has consistently adopted an obstructionist tactics’ strategy since 1977, raising issues regarding run-of-river projects under construction on the western rivers by India. A case in point is the Kishanganga Hydroelectric Project which is all set to be dedicated to the nation nearly three decades after its conception.The Kishanganga Hydroelectric Project in Kashmir’s Gurez Valley is a run-of-the-river project that includes a 37-metre high concrete rock fill dam across the Kishanganga river, located just before it flows across the Line of Control (LoC) into Pakistan-occupied Kashmir. It will divert the water to an underground powerhouse through a 23.25-km tunnel and will generate 1,713 million units of power per annum, of which the state of Jammu and Kashmir will be provided 12 per cent.In the early nineties, India had informed Pakistan of its intentions to construct the Kishanganga Hydroelectric Project. After a gap of almost three decades, this 330-MW power project worth Rs 5,750 crore has been commissioned in stages during March-April this year and is likely to be inaugurated by Prime Minister Narendra Modi during the third week of May.So, what are the reasons for such an unprecedented delay to a relatively small hydroelectric project?The prime reasons for this have been Pakistan’s consistent efforts to raise objections to the execution of this project, each time requiring India to clarify its position, a long-drawn process, leading every time to further validation of India’s stand. The objections have been rather arbitrary, belying the delay tactics approach of Pakistan for any development in the area. The main objections have been that inter-tributary diversions were barred as per the provisions of the Indus Water Treaty and that existing Pakistani uses must be protected as execution of this project  would deprive Pakistan of 27 per cent of the river’s natural flows, thereby adversely affecting 1,33,000 ha of irrigated area in the Neelum valley. Pakistan also raised objections relating to certain design features.In response, India clarifying its position informed Pakistan that the Kishanganga project on the LoC was a run-of-the-river scheme. The Indus Water Treaty categorically permitted inter-tributary diversion as per Article III (2) and Para 15 (iii) of Annexure D. The treaty stipulated that “where a plant is located on a tributary of the Jhelum of which Pakistan has an agricultural use or hydro-electric use, the water released below the plant may be delivered, if necessary, into another tributary but only to the extent that the then existing agricultural use or hydro-electric use by Pakistan on the former tributary would not be adversely affected”, a clause respected and adhered to by India.Further, in 2010, Pakistan took the matter to the Permanent Court of Arbitration at The Hague, which stayed the project for three years. But in 2013, the court ruled that the Kishanganga was “a run-of-the-river plant within the meaning of the Indus Waters Treaty and that India may accordingly divert water from the Kishanganga (Neelum River) for power generation.” The court, however, also ruled that India was under an obligation to “construct and operate” the Kishanganga dam in such a way that it “maintains a minimum flow of water in the Kishanganga/Neelum River.” The minimum flow was fixed at 9 cumecs (318 cusecs). India, duly adhering to the observation, voluntarily declared that it was lowering the height of the dam from the planned 98 m to 37m and resumed construction in full swing.In August 2016, concerned about the performance of their under-construction Neelum-Jhelum hydro station (900 MW) at Nowshera, Pakistan approached the World Bank, the facilitator of the treaty, to prove that India was violating the treaty as well as the court’s verdict. Pakistan requested the World Bank to appoint a court of arbitration to review the design of the Kishanganga project.India rejected the suggestion on the grounds that Pakistan’s objections were technical in nature and that the matter should be decided by a neutral expert. Pakistan disagreed, arguing that a decision by a technical expert was non-binding and India would be under no obligation to implement the expert’s recommendation. This issue continues to be the focus of several interactions lately under the aegis of the World Bank but no decision has been arrived at since Pakistan’s representation lacks merit and substance. It is thus quite apparent that Pakistan has, once again, lost one more diplomatic battle.However, for India, there is a need to draw a lesson. It is apparent that a think tank in Pakistan has been consistently resisting the construction of any hydropower project on the western rivers even though all projects by India are the run-of-the-river projects and in tune with the treaty stipulations. India’s stance has, in the past, been accepted by the Neutral Expert in case of Baglihar and the Court of Arbitration in case of Kishanganga.Taking the benefit of the lessons learnt, there is need to expedite construction/completion of various projects in the pipeline on priority and draw full benefits entitled under the provisions of the treaty for economic growth.


    ‘Air Cavalry’ tested, may need a recast Ajay Banerjee in New Delhi

    ‘Air Cavalry’ tested, may need a recast

    Ajay Banerjee in New DelhiIn the heat of May in Rajasthan, a squadron of helicopters flew a few metres above ground, attempting to evade ‘enemy radars.’ On ground, in a separate corridor, moved a column of T-90 tanks in attack formation. The Indian Army’s tested ‘Air Cavalry’ – a concept the US introduced in 1965. The US’ first ‘Air Cavalry’ division arrived in Vietnam in August and September 1965. Airmobile operations used helicopters to fly over difficult terrains and move behind enemy lines to air-assault targeted objectives. The ‘air cavalry’ was tried during the four-week exercise ‘Vijay Prahar’ conducted by the Jaipur-headquartered South Western Command at the Mahajan field firing ranges near Suratgarh. The concept of ‘Air Cavalry’ employing attack and weaponized helicopters has been validated, a statement from the South Western Command said at the end of the exercise on May 9. The exercise was aimed at designing an offensive battle on the principles of a ‘deep air-land battle’ with real-time intelligence-surveillance and reconnaissance using space-based technology. It used the elements of the Mathura-based 1 Strike Corps, about 25,000 troops, tanks, UAVs, IAF fighter jets and attack helicopters. It included a component of fighting and surviving in battle after a tactical nuclear weapon is fired by the enemy.Manoj Joshi, Distinguished Fellow at the Observor Research Foundation (ORF) National Security Programme, disagrees with the use of attack helicopters beyond the ‘forward edge’ of the battle. With fluid battle conditions, defining the ‘forward edge’ would be tough. In the era of shoulder-fired missiles, a low-flying armed copter cannot be used in an offensive style. There are other ways to use a copter, he said. He cited the example of Soviet helicopters being hit during the Afghan invasion (1979-1989) by the Mujahideen who had US-supplied Stinger missiles. The battle of Karbala in Iraq in 2003 led to the destruction of many American attack copters. The US used the ‘air cavalry’ to some good use, but lost about 5,000 men in Vietnam despite the fact there were no shoulder-fired missiles then, he said.

    Why ‘Air Cavalry’ now?

    The Army first experimented it in the 1980s. Starting 2019, the Army and the IAF, will start adding the new-age attack copters and the number will go up 230 copters over the next decade. Lt Gen Cherish Mathson, Commander of the South-Western Command, said after the exercise: “We have been working on this (air cavalry) in consonance with the air force.”In 2014, the Ministry of Defence accepted the need to have 39 armed helicopters which will fly overhead when ground-based Strike Corps elements move in for an attack.

    Tactical N-strike

    In the second week of February this year, the US Congress heard director of National Intelligence Dan Coats on possible worldwide threats. He warned how Pakistan continues to develop short-range tactical weapons.The Indian assessment says tactical nukes are an option for Pakistan if the ‘Cold-Start’ doctrine — a strike by armoured units deep inside Pakistan — is operationalized. A tactical nuke is small warhead targeted at ground forces. The Army is gearing itself to fight and win in the battle field ‘contaminated’ by a nuclear strike. “It a real threat. we must keep practising it”, says Lt Gen KJ Singh (retd),  a former Western Army Commander, who was in 63 Cavalry, a 1971 war decorated regiment.Almost all the Russian-origin T-90 and T-72 tanks — the prime fighting machines on the western front — have been fitted with a specialized kit to allow troops to survive and even carry forward with a counter-attack in case of tactical nuclear strike.


    Naik Kuldeep Nainwal attains martyrdom

    Tribune News Service

    Dehradun, May 20

    Naik Kuldeep Nainwal of Dehradun, who was grievously injured while fighting terrorists in the Kulgam district of Jammu and Kashmir during the month of April and was undergoing treatment at Pune military hospital, succumbed to his injuries on Sunday.A pall of gloom descended on the Harrawala locality of Dehradun, where martyr’s family is residing. The mortal remains of the martyr are expected to arrive in Dehradun on Monday.The Martyr’s father Chakradhar Prasad Nainwal had retired from the post of hony captain from the Army.Martyr Naik Kuldeep Nainwal had joined the Mahar Regiment in the year 2001 and was posted in Kashmir for the past two-and-a-half years. Chief Minister Trivendra Singh Rawat had enquired about the well-being of Kuldeep some time back.After suffering bullet injuries in Kulgam the encounter, a grievously injured Naik Nainwal was rushed to Army’s RR Hospital where after undergoing treatment for a while he was referred to        Army hospital Pune, where he finally succumbed to his injuries.


    Pakistani troops ‘plead for ceasefire’ after BSF destroys assets across IB

    Pakistani troops ‘plead for ceasefire’ after BSF destroys assets across IB

    The BSF had lost two of its jawans in the latest round of unprovoked firing on the Jammu IB. AFP file

    Jammu, May 20

    The Border Security Force (BSF) has said that the Pakistan Rangers on Sunday “pleaded” with them to stop firing along the IB after being pounded with heavy artillery that also left a trooper dead across the border.

    ANI@ANI

    #WATCH: BSF troops on the western borders, bust a bunker across international boundary on May 19. #JammuAndKashmir (Source: BSF)

    10:50 AM – May 20, 2018

    Twitter Ads info and privacy

    The border guarding force also released a 19-second thermal-imagery footage showing the destruction of a Pakistani picket across the border in retaliation to the unprovoked firing and shelling along the IB. “(Pakistan) Rangers called up Jammu BSF formation today and beseeched to stop firing,” a BSF spokesman said.

    “The befitting reply by BSF units to the unprovoked shelling and firing across the IB by Pakistani forces has forced them to plead for ceasefire,” a senior official said.

    “For the last three days, the precision fire of BSF troopers on Pakistani firing locations inflicted heavy losses and on Saturday this firing found their mark with one of the rangers in chicken neck area,” the official said.

    The BSF had lost two of its jawans in this latest round of unprovoked firing on the Jammu IB over the last few days.

    A number of civilians were also killed and injured in the Jammu area due to this firing incident which was seen to have increased in the wake of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s day-long visit to Jammu and Kashmir on Saturday.

    Jammu and Kashmir witnessed a spurt in Pakistani shelling and firing along the IB and the Line of Control (LoC) this year.

    Over 700 incidents of fire and shelling were reported, which left 38 people including 18 security personnel dead and scores injured. PTI


    China’s gold mine at Arunachal border may become another flash point with India

    China's gold mine at Arunachal border may become another flash point with India

    China claims Arunachal Pradesh as part of southern Tibet.

    Beijing, May 20

    China has begun large-scale mining operations on its side of the border with Arunachal Pradesh where a huge trove of gold, silver and other precious minerals valued at about $60 billion has been found, a media report said on Sunday.

    The mine project is being undertaken in Lhunze County under Chinese control adjacent to the Indian border, the Hong Kong-based South China Morning Post reported.

    China claims Arunachal Pradesh as part of southern Tibet.

    Projecting the mining operations as part of China’s move to take over Arunachal Pradesh, the report said “people familiar with the project say the mines are part of an ambitious plan by Beijing to reclaim South Tibet”.

    “China’s moves to lay claim to the region’s natural resources while rapidly building up infrastructure could turn it into ‘another South China Sea’,” it said.

    The Post report with inputs from local officials, Chinese geologists and strategic experts comes less than a month after the first ever informal summit between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and President Xi Jinping that was aimed at cooling tensions to avert incidents like the Dokalam military standoff last year.

    The 73-day standoff marked a new low in bilateral ties.

    Lhunze was in the news last October, just about two months after Dokalam, when Xi in a rare gesture replied to correspondence from a herding family in Lhunze County underscoring Beijing’s claim to the area.

    The family is based in Yumai, China’s smallest town in terms of population, located close to Arunachal Pradesh.

    Xi thanked the father and his two daughters for their loyalty and contributions to China, and also urged the people of Lhunze to “set down roots” to develop the area for the national interest.

    The Post report said although mining has been going on in the world’s highest mountain range for thousands of years, the challenge of accessing the remote terrain and concerns about environmental damage had until now limited the extent of the activities.

    But the unprecedented heavy investment by the Chinese government to build roads and other infrastructure in the area has made travel easy.

    Most of the precious minerals, which include rare earths used to make hi-tech products, are hidden under Lhunze County, the report said.

    By the end of last year, the scale of mining activity in Lhunze had surpassed that of all other areas in Tibet, it said.

    People have poured into the area so fast that even local government officials could not provide a precise count for the current population, it said.

    “Enormous, deep tunnels have been dug into the mountains along the military confrontation line, allowing thousands of tonnes of ore to be loaded and transported out by trucks daily, along roads built through every village,” it said.

    Extensive power lines and communication networks have been established, while construction is under way on an airport that can handle passenger jets, it said.

    With more mines being dug in Lhunze and surroundings, a county official told the Post that more than 80 per cent of the county government’s tax income came from mining.

    The mines would also lead to a situation akin to “another South China Sea” arising out of the world’s highest mountain range, it said.

    Zheng Youye, a professor at the China University of Geosciences in Beijing and the lead scientist for a Beijing-funded northern Himalayan minerals survey, confirmed to the Post that a series of discoveries in recent years put the potential value of ores under Lhunze and the nearby area at 370 billion yuan ($58 billion).

    “This is just a preliminary estimate. More surveys are underway,” he said.

    There could be more big discoveries as Chinese researchers learn more about the area. With strong financial backing from the government, they have already amassed extensive data on the region.

    According to Zheng, the newfound ores could tip the balance of power between China and India in the Himalayas.

    He said Chinese troops withdrew in the 1962 war from the areas in Arunachal Pradesh as they had no people to hold the territory.

    The new mining activities would lead to a rapid and significant increase in the Chinese population in the Himalayas, Zheng said, which would provide stable, long-term support for any diplomatic or military operations aimed at gradually driving Indian forces out of territory claimed by China.

    “This is similar to what has happened in the South China Sea” where Beijing has claimed much of the contested waters by building artificial islands and increasing its naval activity, he said.

    Hao Xiaoguang, a researcher with the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Wuhan, Hubei who specialises in India-China issues said Beijing was likely to take the same approach to the Himalayas as in the South China Sea.

    As China’s economic, geopolitical and military strength continues to increase, “it is only a matter of time before South Tibet returns to Chinese control”, Hao claimed.

    “What China (has) achieved today in the South China Sea was almost unthinkable a decade ago. I am optimistic (about) what will happen in the Himalayas in the coming years because President Xi has made it clear that ‘not a single inch of our land will be or can be ceded from China’, which definitely includes South Tibet,” he said.

    But Hao said the Lhunze mining boom would not be expanded to other areas due to environmental reasons. In Lhunze, some of the newcomers are still acclimatising. The area is already teeming with people from different parts of China.

    Weng Qingzhen, who owns a Sichuan restaurant in the county, said she moved there less than two months ago after friends and relatives told her about the mining boom. PTI


    China begins large-scale mining at Arunachal border

    Beijing, May 20

    China has begun large-scale mining operations on its side of the border with Arunachal Pradesh where a huge trove of gold, silver and other precious minerals valued at about $60 billion has been found, a media report said on Sunday.The mine project is being undertaken in Lhunze County under Chinese control adjacent to the Indian border, the Hong Kong-based South China Morning Post reported.China claims Arunachal Pradesh as part of southern Tibet. Projecting the mining operations as part of China’s move to take over Arunachal Pradesh, the report said “people familiar with the project say the mines are part of an ambitious plan by Beijing to reclaim South Tibet”. “China’s moves to lay claim to the region’s natural resources while rapidly building up infrastructure could turn it into ‘another South China Sea’ they said,” it said.The Post report with inputs from local officials, Chinese geologists as well as strategic experts comes less than a month after the first ever informal summit between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and President Xi Jinping that was aimed at cooling tensions to avert incidents like the Doklam military standoff last year. The 73-day standoff marked a new low in bilateral ties.Lhunze was in the news last October, just about two months after Doklam, when Xi in a rare gesture replied to correspondence from a herding family in Lhunze County underscoring Beijing’s claim to the area.The family is based in Yumai, China’s smallest town in terms of population located close to Arunachal Pradesh. Xi thanked the father and his two daughters for their loyalty and contributions to China, and also urged the people of Lhunze to “set down roots” to develop the area for the national interest.The Post report said although mining has been going on in the world’s highest mountain range for thousands of years, the challenge of accessing the remote terrain and concerns about environmental damage had until now limited the extent of the activities. But the unprecedented heavy investment by the Chinese government to build roads and other infrastructure in the area has made travel easy.Most of the precious minerals which include rare earths used to make hi-tech products are hidden under Lhunze County, the report said. By the end of last year, the scale of mining in Lhunze had surpassed that of all other areas in Tibet, it said. — PTI‘Another South China Sea’

    • The mine project is being undertaken in Lhunze County under Chinese control adjacent to the Indian border
    • People familiar with the mining project say the mines are part of an ambitious plan by Beijing to reclaim South Tibet
    • Most of the precious minerals which include rare earths used to make hi-tech products are hidden under Lhunze County

    Pakistan to give greater authority to PoK, Gilgit-Baltistan

    Pakistan to give greater authority to PoK, Gilgit-Baltistan

    The meeting was chaired by Pakistan PM Shahid Khaqan Abbasi.

    Islamabad, May 20

    Pakistan’s top civil and military leaders have decided to give greater administrative and financial authority to Pakistan-occupied Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan, the region through which the controversial $50 billion China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) passes.During a meeting of the National Security Committee (NSC) — the top civil and military body—Sartaj Aziz, Deputy Chairman Planning Commission and the Ministry of Kashmir Affairs & Gilgit-Baltistan, yesterday briefed the Committee on the PoK and Gilgit-Baltistan reform proposals, an official statement said.The meeting chaired by Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi reviewed these proposals and after detailed deliberations a consensus was reached on the “devolution of greater administrative authority and financial powers” to the PoK government and the Gilgit-Baltistan government, according to the statement.The details of administrative and financial reform have not been shared so far.However, there was also consensus over retention of the PoK and Gilgit-Baltistan Councils as advisory bodies; and the grant of a five-year tax holiday to Gilgit-Baltistan so as to create adequate incentives for the development of the region and bring it at par with the other areas of Pakistan.Gilgit-Baltistan is treated as a separate geographical entity by Pakistan. Balochistan, Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab and Sindh are four provinces of Pakistan.India has termed as “entirely unacceptable” any possible attempt by Pakistan to declare the Gilgit-Baltistan region, bordering the disputed Pakistan-occupied Kashmir, as the fifth province. India has protested to China over the CPEC which goes through Gilgit-Baltistan region.It is believed that China’s concerns about the unsettled status of Gilgit-Baltistan prompted Pakistan to change its status.Earlier media reports had said Pakistan plans to elevate the constitutional status of the region to provide legal cover to the CPEC.The NSC also endorsed that FATA shall be merged with Khyber Pakhtunkhwa along with the introduction of the administrative and judicial institutional structures and laws of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, the statement said.The Committee directed the ministries concerned to work out the constitutional, legal and administrative modalities for the merger in consultation with all parties in the Parliament.The meeting was attended by Interior Minister Ahsan Iqbal, Minister for Defence & Foreign Affairs Khurram Dastgir Khan, Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee Gen Zubair Mahmood Hayat, Army chief Gen Qamar Javed Bajwa, Chief of Naval and Air forces, ISI chief and other senior civil and military officials. — PTI


    Pakistan again violates ceasefire in Arnia sector of Jammu & Kashmir

    Pakistan again violates ceasefire in Arnia sector of Jammu & Kashmir

    BSF troops guarding the border retaliated. PTI file

    Jammu, May 21

    In yet another ceasefire violation, Pakistani Rangers on Monday fired mortar shells on border outposts at several places in Jammu and Kashmir’s Arnia sector, prompting retaliation by the BSF personnel guarding the International Border.The mortar firing from across the border started around 0700 hours in Arnia sector of Jammu and was still continuing when the reports last came in, a senior BSF official told PTI.“Three border outposts are under fire from the Pakistani Rangers and the personnel deployed there are also retaliating to silence the Pakistani guns,” the official said.“However, there is no immediate report of any casualty,” he said.On Sunday night, Pakistani troops fired small arms and mortars, targeting Narayanpur area of Ramgarh sector in Samba district, hours after “pleading” with the BSF to stop firing, after being pounded with heavy artillery that left a trooper dead across the border.The BSF also released a 19-second thermal-imagery footage, showing the destruction of a Pakistani picket across the border, in retaliation to the unprovoked firing and shelling along the IB.The BSF has lost two of its jawans in the latest round of unprovoked firing along the IB in Jammu region since May 15. PTI


    MoD okay with fewer permanent officers

    Army wants higher intake of Short Service Commission officers to reduce salary burden

    MoD okay with fewer permanent officers

    Phased plan in works to ‘sweeten’ terms of employment for officers serving 10 or 14 yrs

    Ajay Banerjee

    Tribune News Service

    New Delhi, May 20

    Faced with a growing salary budget, the Indian Army has moved a proposal to the Ministry of Defence to increase the intake of officers under Short Service Commission (SSC) and correspondingly reduce the number of permanent commission or regular commissioned officers.The MoD is okay with implementing the plan in phases to increase the SSC officer intake by “sweetening” the terms of employment for those who serve for either 10 years or 14 years in the Army. Sources have confirmed to The Tribune that a phased plan is in the works.At present, the ratio between permanent commission and SSC is 4:1. The Ajai Vikram Singh Committee (AVSC) envisaged a ratio of 1:1.1 between full-time regular officers and the support cadre, largely from the SSC. The move comes almost 10 years after the Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS) in October 2008 approved a reduction in regular cadre.The MoD is likely to agree to pay a lumpsum grant to SSC officers. The proposal is to allow two-month salary for each year of service for those completing 10 years and four-month salary for each year of service for completing 14 years.Then there is professional training to equip these youth for jobs once they leave service. The Army has suggested a year’s study course for those completing 10 years and two-year study course for those working for 14 years. This will include professional courses.The second phase of the plan includes giving ex-servicemen status and medical treatment facility as admissible to regular officers.An SSC officer ideally retires between 30 and 34 years of age, while a regular commissioned officer, even if he does not go beyond the Colonel rank, serves till 54 years of age.With these officers going out of the Army in the prime of their youth, the Army has asked the MoD to work out a plan with other ministries to allow them to take competitive civil services examinations in respective states or at the Centre. In the budget this fiscal ending March 31, 2019, salaries of the three services and civilians work out to Rs 1,18,966 crore — almost 40 per cent of the budget — and another 1.08 lakh crore is the pension bill. In other words, salaries and pensions take up more money than what is allocated for modernisation. Having SSC officers will reduce this burden.The Ministry of Defence had set up the AVSC in 2001. The report was implemented in two phases — in 2004 and 2008. Another set of recommendations on faster promotions and increase in posts at Colonel rank and above has been implemented. Ajai Vikram Singh was a former Defence Secretary.