Sanjha Morcha

Narrow the gender gap in global peacekeeping

India must help to bridge this lacunae and prevent crimes against women and girls in international conflicts

Ifeel much better prepared to be deployed as UN Peacekeeper to a peacekeeping mission, more accountable for preventing conflict-related sexual violence and responding to women’s socio-economic concerns in and post conflict,” said a graduate of a recently-concluded Female Military Officer’s Course, organised by UN Women and the Center for UN Peacekeeping, India. Recruitment, deployment and focused training of female officers is imperative to overcome existing barriers and for gender parity in UN peacekeeping. Women’s participation in UN peacekeeping is more likely to improve civilian protection, especially the prevention of sexual violence against women and girls. But UN Peacekeeping, whose mandate is civilian protection through military, police and civilian contingents from troop contributing countries, remains a male preserve. As of March 31, 2018, women constituted 5% of the 91,058-strong combined forces of military and police peacekeepers, making up 4% of the military and 11% of the police units.

UN PHOTOIn 2007, for the first time in UN history, the Indian first all­women UN peacekeeping police unit was deployed to Liberia, with subsequent deployments in 2008 and 2009

This is despite women’s demonstrated contribution to peacekeeping worldwide. In January 2007, for the first time in UN history, the Indian first all-women UN peacekeeping police unit was deployed to Liberia, with subsequent deployments in 2008 and 2009. They provided security at local events, engaged in riot control and patrols with local and UN police. They communicated with local women, nurturing trust between the police and local communities through community outreach. While this was hailed by the then UN secretary general Ban Ki Moon and Liberian president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf as precedent setting in peacekeeping missions, similar contributions of women peacekeepers from other countries have been recorded in West, East, North and South Africa, South America, and South and Central Asia.

From a rights standpoint, United Nations Security Council Resolution 2242 calls for doubling women’s participation in UN missions. While the landmark UN Security Council Resolution 1,325 emphasises integrating a gender perspective in all peace efforts, a global initiative was launched in 2009 to increase numbers of women police in UN peacekeeping. As one of the largest troop contributors, India can further lead in bridging the gender gap in UN Peacekeeping and preventing crimes against women and girls in international conflicts. A starter could be adopting a national gender sensitive force generation policy on UN peacekeeping, and examining barriers to recruitment and advancement of female officers, which perpetuate inequality in this sphere.

Jean D’Cunha is head, UN Women Myanmar. Ajita Vidyarthi is security and migration analyst at UN Women Multi Country Office in India. The views expressed are personal


Army chief in Valley, takes stock of security situation

Stresses need to maintain vigil to defeat designs of hostile forces

SRINAGAR : Army chief General Bipin Rawat on Thursday arrived in Kashmir on a two-day visit against the backdrop of a halt on security operations in Jammu and Kashmir during the month of Ramzan.

HT PHOTO■ Army chief General Bipin Rawat visited formation headquarters and units at Badami Bagh in Srinagar on Thursday.The army chief’s visit coincides with the visit of Centre’s interlocutor Dineshwar Sharma, who met chief minister Mehbooba Mufti and governor Narendra Nath Vohra.

Accompanied by the Chinar Corps Commander Lt Gen AK Bhatt, the Army Chief visited formation headquarters and units.

General Rawat met top formation commanders who briefed him about the current situation, especially about situation in the Valley and on the Line of Control. The Army Chief was also briefed about the impact of unilateral ceasefire, meanwhile he also reviewed security situation in the Valley.

“The Army chief visited formation headquarters and units where he was briefed by the commanders on ground, regarding the operational preparedness. The Army Chief was appreciative of the measures and standard operating procedures instituted by the units and formations to meet the challenges posed by the inimical elements,” defence spokesman said.

He said that the army chief also commended performance of the troops in recent successful operations and stressed the need to maintain extra vigil to defeat designs of hostile forces.

DINESHWAR MEETS CM Meanwhile, Dineshwar Sharma arrived in Srinagar on Wednesday afternoon and had a detailed meeting with chief minister Mehbooba Mufti. Officials said, during the meeting, overall situation in the State, particularly after the announcement of Ramadan ceasefire by the Centre, was discussed.

Sharma also briefed the CM about his recent interactions with a cross-section of society in different areas and the situation along the borders in the State

RAISE VIGIL AT BORDER Union home minister Rajnath Singh on Thursday ordered a stepping up of vigil along the international border, amid heightened tensions with Pakistan on the western frontier

According to a home ministry statement, the directive was given at a high-level meeting, which was attended by Union home secretary Rajiv Gauba and special secretary (border management) BR Sharma. During the meeting, the officials took stock of the progress of construction of border fencing, roads and outposts along India’s borders with neighbouring countries.


Tinkering with tribunals will make them useless

Armed Forces Tribunal, Indian Army, Para SF, Indian Special forces

The Armed Forces Tribunal (AFT) was established as a military tribunal under the Armed Forces Tribunal Act in 2007. This was based on the Law Commission’s 169th report of 1999, which stated that disciplinary and service matters of military personnel required quick resolution and proposed a special tribunal for para-military and armed forces. The act was steered through Parliament by the defence ministry, leaving the para-military, Assam Rifles and Coast Guard out of its purview.

The principal bench of the AFT is based in Delhi and it has regional benches at Chandigarh, Lucknow, Kolkata, Guwahati, Chennai, Kochi, Mumbai and Jaipur. Except for Chandigarh and Lucknow, which have three benches each, all others have a single bench. Each bench comprises of a judicial member, who is a retired high court judge, and an administrative member, who is a retired member of the armed forces.

In a democracy, the judiciary by nature is lenient. However, the armed forces because of their role and tasks must follow a disciplined structure, without which they would fail. Hence, the armed forces are governed by their respective acts and rules which are the Army Act of 1950, Air Force Act of 1950, the Navy Act of 1957 and the Defence Services Regulations. Disciplinary punishments, granted under respective acts, are periodically challenged in AFTs. Unless the circumstances and specific regulations are clarified to the judge, leniency in judgement would impact military discipline.

Further, vagaries and conditions of service are vastly different from any Central government organization. Hence AFTs have been liberal in approving disability pensions, which an unrelenting bureaucracy challenges in the Supreme Court to no avail. To advice the judicial member on service-specific issues and apprise him of the conditions of service, an administrative member with decades of service experience is appointed.

Till June 2017, the AFTs functioned at near full strength and was effective. After the government issued unilateral notifications incorporating changes in its composition and functioning, presently under challenge in the Supreme Court, there has been no induction of fresh members, resulting in almost non-functional courts. Thus, the very reason for creating the AFT, speedy disposal of cases pertaining to the members of the armed forces, has been lost.

On 1 June 2017, the government amended the AFT Act, amongst 19 other existing laws, enhancing its powers pertaining to the appointment and removal of members of various tribunals. Amongst the major changes which affect the functioning of the AFT is the appointment of the administrative member.

The earlier rules had stated that the administrative member could be retired major generals and above. However, the new rules state any person, ‘of ability, integrity and standing having special knowledge of, and professional experience of not less than 20 years’ in multiple fields not connected with the armed forces but ‘in the opinion of the government is useful to the AFT’ could be appointed. Thus, knowledge of service conditions and military law is not essential, making such appointments redundant. It opens doors for appointing IAS and other Central government service members, who lack even basic military knowledge.

The chairperson of the AFT was appointed by the president, hence was difficult for the government to remove. The changed rules state that he would be appointed by the government in consultation with the chief justice, thereby denuding his appointment. Earlier rules stated only a retired High Court or Supreme Court judge could be the chairperson, whereas the amended rules state ‘any person who is qualified to be a judge of the Supreme Court’ could be appointed. Thus, an advocate with ten years’ experience can be nominated as a chairperson.

The appointment of the judicial and administrative members was amended so that they would be appointed by a search-cum-selection-committee which would comprise a Supreme Court judge, chairperson of AFT (appointed by the government), defence secretary and another member of the executive. Thus, majority power would be with the executive. The Supreme Court has disagreed stating it cannot be tilted towards the executive.

The new rules place the AFTs under the defence ministry, whereas earlier based on Supreme Court directions, they were placed under the law ministry. The power to remove members has also been diluted and the MoD can constitute a committee to recommend removal. These powers were earlier with the Supreme Court.

The new rules have reduced tenure of members from five to three years. It appears, when linked up with the other amendments, aimed at opening doors for ex-secretaries of the government, who retire at 62, to be nominated to the AFT, for which they would otherwise have been barred.

These amendments, which would alter the functioning of the AFT and make it useless for the task for which it was created, angered many veterans who practice in AFTs and they approached the Supreme Court. The court’s final determination is likely in July.

The bureaucracy, worried about a possible court rebuff, advertised for vacant posts based on its amended rules. It is now seeking the court’s permission to go ahead with the selection. If it succeeds, the AFTs would become just another example of the government’s apathy to serving and veteran military personnel.

A fallout of the case has been that unless court orders are finally issued, no fresh appointments can be made. Hence most AFTs are either non-functional or those with multiple benches have just one functional bench. This has impacted clearance of cases.

The sole reason for creating the AFT is now being lost. The government which has denied the forces various facilities is now seeking to make the AFTs redundant. It will require a concerted effort by all who support the military to pressurise the government against making a mockery of an institution created to speed up justice.

The writer is a retired Major-General of the Indian Army.

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Till June 2017, the AFTs functioned at near full strength and was effective. After the government issued unilateral notifications incorporating changes in its composition and functioning, presently under challenge in the Supreme Court, there has been no induction of fresh members, resulting in almost non-functional courts. Thus, the very reason for creating the AFT, speedy disposal of cases pertaining to the members of the armed forces, has been lost.
On 1 June 2017, the government amended the AFT Act, amongst 19 other existing laws, enhancing its powers pertaining to the appointment and removal of members of various tribunals. Amongst the major changes which affect the functioning of the AFT is the appointment of the administrative member.
The earlier rules had stated that the administrative member could be retired major generals and above. However, the new rules state any person, ‘of ability, integrity and standing having special knowledge of, and professional experience of not less than 20 years’ in multiple fields not connected with the armed forces but ‘in the opinion of the government is useful to the AFT’ could be appointed. Thus, knowledge of service conditions and military law is not essential, making such appointments redundant. It opens doors for appointing IAS and other Central government service members, who lack even basic military knowledge.
The chairperson of the AFT was appointed by the president, hence was difficult for the government to remove. The changed rules state that he would be appointed by the government in consultation with the chief justice, thereby denuding his appointment. Earlier rules stated only a retired High Court or Supreme Court judge could be the chairperson, whereas the amended rules state ‘any person who is qualified to be a judge of the Supreme Court’ could be appointed. Thus, an advocate with ten years’ experience can be nominated as a chairperson.
The appointment of the judicial and administrative members was amended so that they would be appointed by a search-cum-selection-committee which would comprise a Supreme Court judge, chairperson of AFT (appointed by the government), defence secretary and another member of the executive. Thus, majority power would be with the executive. The Supreme Court has disagreed stating it cannot be tilted towards the executive.
The new rules place the AFTs under the defence ministry, whereas earlier based on Supreme Court directions, they were placed under the law ministry. The power to remove members has also been diluted and the MoD can constitute a committee to recommend removal. These powers were earlier with the Supreme Court.
The new rules have reduced tenure of members from five to three years. It appears, when linked up with the other amendments, aimed at opening doors for ex-secretaries of the government, who retire at 62, to be nominated to the AFT, for which they would otherwise have been barred.
These amendments, which would alter the functioning of the AFT and make it useless for the task for which it was created, angered many veterans who practice in AFTs and they approached the Supreme Court. The court’s final determination is likely in July.
The bureaucracy, worried about a possible court rebuff, advertised for vacant posts based on its amended rules. It is now seeking the court’s permission to go ahead with the selection. If it succeeds, the AFTs would become just another example of the government’s apathy to serving and veteran military personnel.
A fallout of the case has been that unless court orders are finally issued, no fresh appointments can be made. Hence most AFTs are either non-functional or those with multiple benches have just one functional bench. This has impacted clearance of cases.
The sole reason for creating the AFT is now being lost. The government which has denied the forces various facilities is now seeking to make the AFTs redundant. It will require a concerted effort by all who support the military to pressurise the government against making a mockery of an institution created to speed up justice.

APPEAL TO VETERANS(INDIA/ABROAD) TO ASSIST GROWNUP DAUGHTERS OF ARMY OFFICER :::UNDER HEAVY DEBT/AT BEGGING END.

Sanjha Morcha is dedicated towards CAUSE of  welfare of ESM/Widows/Children/Needy at all times

Recently  twin daughters of Lt Col Jasdev Singh (ASC) approached Sanjha Morcha for Financial assistance, who seems to be shaken up.

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They are daughters of Lt   COL JASDEV SINGH, (ASC), S/O LT. COL JAIDEV SINGH, (Signals), left them along with their  mother Sukhjinder Kaur for another woman.

The pitiable narration of their hardships as narrated by the twin Sisters is as under for information of Veterans with kind hearts.

“1. Our mother, who was a simple housewife with NO skills to earn any money to support us, we were left at the mercy of maternal grandparents. We both were school going children at the time and were not aware of our father’s motive or his intentions or of his dispute with our mother Ms Sukhjinder Kaur, d/o Late Sarvjit Singh.

2. We only remember and recollect that our father, Lt Col Jasdev Singh, brought us to Patiala. He was serving in 521 ASC Battalion located in field in Changsari in Assam, between Rangia and Gauhati. We were staying in NARANGI cantonment, near Gauhati. One day, from the blue, he brought us to Patiala with which we had NO connection at all. Thereafter he never saw us.

3.  Clearly, his motive was to seek divorce from our mother so he deliberately kept us away for more than two years, while he was seeing another woman, whom he later married within the same month that he compelled my mother to sign the divorce papers.

4. My mother was devastated but for fear of damaging our emotional strength, she kept us unaware even when he stopped financial help to us. Our mother kept all what was happening, concealed from us fearing adverse psychological and mental health which would have also have direct impact on our studies. He divorced our mother under pressure and manipulation and made the divorce’s proceeding in his favour. Our simple minded mother, was not aware of anything and was made to sign the divorced papers under duress. He completely absolved himself of any responsibility after offering my ‘Socked’ and ‘Stunned’ mother with a meagre amount as one time settlement

5.Needless to say that on learning that out father deserted us and abandoned us we are a disturbed lot, both emotionally and psychologically. It is more than 10 years that we are staying with our mother and grandparents, with whose support we were able to barely manage our studies. We both are still studying to complete our graduations but due to financial constrains are unable to continue further to ensure our employability. Any marriage prospects also look dim. We own no property.

6.The rising prices are pushing us into depression and poverty. With unfinished studies, there is No chance of getting a reasonable job to sustain ourselves. We continue to stay in a rented accommodation at Patiala. The landlords have often threatened to evict us. We are finding it extremely difficult to continue living like this. We cry in complete desperation, unsure of our future. We often think of taking our own lives

7. Our humble submission is to obtain financial assistance from our father but due to financial constrains and with heavy debt of approx RS 5 Lakhs and paying 5% monthly interest on loan amount is accumulating the Loan amount.

8. It is beyond our comprehension, as to how our father abandoned us. As a biological father how can he ‘wash his hands’ off his hands from liability as a father? We fail to understand what was our fault that our father left us along with our mother? Was it because, mother could not bear a son and that we girls.

9. He married our mother , by cheating as he was already married now he has married for third time.With lot of Struggle after 10 years we traced him at # 415/B, Sector 82, Noida.

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Dear Veterans , the above is the reality of painful and hardship faced by two sisters along with their mother , settled in Patiala. Lets come forward and contribute and save well educated and cultured Girls as Family responsibility before they take any extreme step due to burden. Those who EARLIER helped them are now harassing them to return or oblige them. Detail later

The account numbers of both the sisters are as under, the donated amounts can be directly transferred to their accounts.

BANK OF BOTH:::                                                                           

ACCOUNT DETAILS OF BOTH SISTERS

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MISS MEHAK KAUR   D/o Jasdev Singh     

ORIENTAL BANK OF COMMERCE     NEW OFFICERS COLONY , PATIALA,    ACCT NUMBER : 03962413000109   

 IFSC CODE:- ORBC0100396     MICR- 147022002

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MISS CHEHAK KAUR, D/o Jasdev Singh:      

 ORIENTAL BANK OF COMMERCE   , THE MALL PATIALA

 ACCT NUMBER : 06402413000383,    IFSC CODE:- ORBC0100640                                                                                                                MICR- 147022007

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THE VEDIO SHOW HOW DONATION CAN CHANGE LIFE AND CARRIER ::: AS PER TEACHINGS OF GURU GOBIND SINGH JEE.

 


जीओजी युवाओं को दे रही निशुल्क आर्मी भर्ती ट्रेनिंग::: GOG PROVIDING FREE TRAINING TO YOUTHS FOR BSF/CRPF RECRUITMENT

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सुजानपुर/पठानकोट| गार्जियन ऑफ गवर्नेंस (जीओजी) जिला पठानकोट के प्रधान ब्रिगेडियर प्रह्लाद सिंह के नेतृत्व में टीम सुजानपुर में युवाओं को सेना, बीएसएफ व सीआरपीएफ में भर्ती के लिए निशुल्क में ट्रेनिंग देकर प्रशिक्षित कर रही है। ब्रिगेडियर प्रहलाद सिंह ने बताया कि युवाओं को प्रशिक्षित करने का मुख्य उद्देश्य युवाओं को भर्ती दौरान किसी प्रकार की परेशानी न हो। उनकी ओर से यह ट्रेनिंग कैंप लगभग एक माह से शुरू किया गया है ओर इस कैंप में कोई भी बच्चा सुबह 5 से 6 बजे तक बाग वाली माता रोड़ पर स्थित पुल नंबर-10 के समीप आकर उनके साथ संपर्क कर ट्रेनिंग ले सकता है। 


Footprints of India and China’s economies Pritam Singh

The economic growth of India and China, the world’s leading producers of carbon dioxide emissions, has scary environmental implications. However, India is way below the West in terms of per capita emissions and cannot achieve a simplistic trade-off between growth and emissions.

Footprints of India and China’s economies

Pritam Singh

Professor of Economics, Oxford Brookes University, UKIn terms of per capita income, China and India are still in the category of developing economies, but in view of their increasing share in the global GDP, they are now major economic powers. China replaced the USA as the world’s biggest manufacturer in 2010 and overtook it as the top economy in 2014 in terms of its GDP at purchasing power parity. India overtook Japan in 2011 as the third largest economy in the world. China and India together, with 2.7 billion people, encompass 36 per cent of the world’s population. Given this, even if their per capita incomes are lower than the advanced economies, the size of their GDPs means a massive environmental footprint of their economies nationally as well as globally. China and India can no longer hide their national and global environmental responsibilities under the pretext which was perhaps partially valid a few decades ago: that they needed to develop and, therefore, protecting planet Earth from the harmful consequences of global climate change was their lesser concern. China’s share of global GDP was as low as 2.3 per cent in 1980, even lower than India’s at that time, but it jumped to a record 18.3 per cent in 2017. According to an estimate, if the current Sino-Indian growth rates persist, by 2050, they would be the dominant global suppliers of manufactured goods and services, respectively.

Scary environmental implications

The impressive looking economic growth scenario has scary environmental implications. China and India are now among the top producers of carbon dioxide emissions whose implications for pollution and global warming are most serious. In absolute terms, China current carbon dioxoide emissions are more than that of the USA. In fact, China’s carbon dioxide emissions are more than those of the USA and the European Union combined. After China, the USA and the EU, India is the fourth largest carbon dioxide emitter followed closely by Russia. One of the largest concerns is the rise in global warming which is defined as the rise in average temperature of the earth’s atmosphere in comparison with the pre-industrial levels. It is leading to unpredictable weather changes, rising sea levels, floods and droughts, and global agricultural and energy crisis.China has had phenomenal manufacturing growth due to low labour costs in international comparative terms. The full environmental implications of that growth are now manifesting themselves in a vicious manner. Pollution in China’s urban manufacturing centres has risen to threatening levels. According to one study done on 74 cities in China, around a third of the deaths in these cities were smog related and the total number has reached 3 million. On the worst days, the  government makes it mandatory for residents to stay indoors and this has happened several times in Beijing. Delhi faced a somewhat similar situation last summer. Environmental change does not recognise any boundaries. With this smog travelling with the wind, it affects neighbouring countries too.

China’s environmental initiatives

China seems to be showing some awareness of the dangers involved. Some of its environmental initiatives are worth noting and emulating by India. China now is one of the largest pioneers in the renewable energy sector and aims to have 20 per cent of energy coming from renewables by 2030. Another project to help reverse the effects of climate change relates to creating large areas of forest, which were previously used for mining and factories. China announced this January that it is planning to plant a forest of 6.6 million hectares, roughly the size of Ireland, and aims to make 25 per cent of China a forest by 2020, compared to the current 21.7 per cent. Also, with China’s manufacturing sector being so strong, it has invested heavily in the production of solar cells, becoming the largest shareholder for solar heating. As a result of the cost-effective production, it has been able to make the electricity produced by the solar panels competitive with the cost of electricity produced by fossil fuels such as oil and gas. Also, it is now the world’s largest producer of hydroelectric power which, of course, is environmentally a contested form of power, especially if based on large dams.These environmental initiatives are challenged by the fact that China accounts for half of the global consumption of coal. Coal is the dirtiest of all fossil fuels and its consumption has to be cut drastically. This holds true for India, too.

India’s progress

India has made some good progress with renewables, mainly wind and solar. Wind farms are now producing 30 per cent of the global production of wind energy. India started looking into wind energy in the 1960s. It now accounts for up to 50 per cent of India’s renewables, with solar close behind. But India has still a lot to learn from China’s environmental initiatives and experiences, and this is one area of fruitful collaboration between the two global giants along with the aims of reducing extreme inequalities and degrading poverty. The project of reducing inequalities is closely intertwined with environmental protection because the worst sufferers of environmental degradation are the poor, especially those dependent on agriculture and forests or living in urban slums.The global environmental responsibilities of India and China have assumed greater significance because the USA, the other global economic power, is abandoning, under the Trump presidency, the climate change negotiation framework aimed at curbing global warmin


Military purchases worth ₹6k cr soon

NEW DELHI: The defence acquisition council (DAC) on Monday set the ball rolling for buying military hardware worth ₹6,900 crore, including thermal imaging night sights for rocket launchers and equipment that will enhance the capabilities of the air force’s Sukhoi-30 warplanes, a ministry spokesperson said.

The council, headed by defence minister Nirmala Sitharaman, approved the purchase of the hardware through the indigenous route to boost India’s capabilities to locally produce weapons and systems.

“The thermal imaging sight for 84mm rocket launchers will be used by troops in operations to facilitate accurate and continuous engagement of moving and static enemy targets and destruction of bunkers during hours of complete darkness,” the spokesperson said.

The slow pace of acquisition has hurt India’s military capabilities. The government inked a $100-million contract for 1.86 lakh bullet proof jackets for the army, a decade after the force moved the case. Financial constraints, cumbersome procedures and unrealistic qualitative requirements set by the armed forces are among the key factors that hinder modernisation, said a senior official who did not wish to be named. “Forget the bigger purchases, the system is such that we take a decade to equip soldiers with new assault rifles and bullet proof vests,” he said.

Ammunition is also a problem area. The army told a parliamentary panel in March that it was short of ₹6,380 crore to build ammunition stocks necessary for war for 10 days. The panel was also told that even as China and Pakistan were modernising their militaries at a lightning-fast pace, a looming financial crisis was crippling India’s combat capabilities.

The equipment cleared for purchase on Monday is significant as it will enable the army to “detect and recognise” enemy tanks and soldiers.

The DAC also approved a project for the design and development of Long Range Dual Band Infrared Imaging Search and Track System (IRST) for SU-30 MKI fighters.

Experts said Sitharaman’s predecessors in the ministry had also cleared the decks for weapon purchases worth lakhs of crores but not many of those clearances translated into deals.

“The projects that have been given a go-ahead are at the acceptance of necessity stage (the first step toward making procurement under the Defence Procurement Procedure). The real test would be to see how many of these cases end up as contracts …” said military affairs expert Air Vice Marshal Kapil Kak (retd).


Stone-pelters today, gun-wielders tomorrow by Col Mahesh Chadha (retd)

Reconciliation, and not confrontation, is the key to peace. In this time of crisis in J&K, the nation needs to stand together with sincerity of purpose, without any hidden agenda of political parties, to give peace a chance.

Stone-pelters today, gun-wielders tomorrow

Col Mahesh Chadha (retd)

Catch them young is what presents a picture of the prospective diehard generation in the Kashmir valley today. It is now almost three decades that the boys and girls born in the interim have learnt to pursue the mission ingrained in them — to liberate Kashmir from the occupation forces of India. A very simple act of stone-pelting at the security forces (SF) is being practised that obstructs and diminishes the chances of launching any successful operation against the insurgents or the anti-national elements and places them in a win-win situation; one, making the terrorists escape under the shield provided by them and two, ensuring their own safety for any action taken against them would make the SF liable to prosecution. In the two recent cases where a boy was overrun by the J&K police vehicle and a tourist was done to death with stones brings to fore a question: what could a driver do when a boy pelting stones on the preceding vehicle came under it and died? To a common man, it would appear as an accident in the heat of the moment, when the terrorists are being chased, the driver sits on the right and the boy came from the left hand side. But to the separatists like the Hurriyat and their supporters, it would appear to be a cold-blooded murder. But the latter case for them is not so. For the SF, this is a very sensitive and critical situation to handle for which they would have to face courts for long. Can this go on forever? After all, it is an Indian blood that would have been preserved for a better cause.

The stone-pelting phenomenon

The question is why these young boys and girls have taken to stone-pelting. May be, some of them have lost their kith and kin in crossfire, or have been subjected to troublesome cordon and search operations carried out regularly by SF to hound out suspected terrorists. Or, above all, that they have been indoctrinated by their peers, leaders, parents, relatives and friends inimical to India and through vitiated propaganda that goes on in their schools and religious places. That such are the atrocities being inflicted upon them as to be confronted with stone-pelting is a mere expression of their ire at the SF — doing a David to a Goliath. Regarding the exodus of Kashmiri Pandits from the valley as a victory over the sympathisers or informers for the SF, it is such youth who in the near future is likely to take up arms and join like their elders the terrorist groups launching a rebellion against the state in the times to come — resulting in civil war-like situation. It must be remembered that the gun is more lethal than the stone. Therefore, wisdom lies in to bear the injuries caused by stones, let the terrorist escape for the time being; for he can only live another day and his turn would come sooner or later. What is the hurry in launching the ‘Operation All Out’, cause and suffer casualties on both sides as insurgency of such high intensity is not likely to die- but continue to simmer? So, it has to be doused in a manner that it does not look anti-Kashmiris as it does today. So, irrespective of the danger imposed upon the SF there is a need to be more tolerant as such retaliatory incidents negate all the good work done by the SF and the state to bring the youth in to main stream.

The solution

From time to time, we have tried many options; but not what we adopted as ‘give and take’ that paved the way for the Mizo National Front to take over the reins from an elected government to terminate the insurgency. The Naga accord is another successful experiment. The fear that such a move may enable the separatists to call for a referendum is ill founded as there are provisions in the Constitution that would require the assent of the President, participation in elections, PoK to be brought under Indian control and it’s participation and, above all, Jammu and Ladakh not toeing such a line to pass the referendum for an accession or joining Pakistan. Perhaps, such a government may be able to re-orientate the stone-pelters to better cause of joining the mainstream.The following are some points that would bring today’s stone-pelters — for they can still be remoulded to utilise their energy towards the cause of peace in Kashmir:

  • Start afresh, listen and not assert on issues that have brought Kashmir to such a pass.
  • A soothing counter propaganda by the authorities in the schools, colleges and other institutions to negate the propaganda by the separatists and the terrorists.
  • Follow the principles of good faith, minimum force and preventive action rather than punitive action.
  • Armed action only against foreign insurgents crossing over to Kashmir.
  • A unilateral cease fire against own trouble makers during religious festivals and when talks are under progress to create an atmosphere of understanding and peace.
  • Reinvent commandments to take forward the essence of Kashmiriat, Insaniyat and Jamhooriat.
  • Assuage the feelings of hurt and animosity against India by constant dialogue with social workers, eminent persons, writers and poets.
  • Dispense quick justice to the victims.

There is nothing worse than shedding more blood on Indian soil revered for ages for its unity in diversity, art and culture for which Kashmir stands out as heaven on earth. In this hour of crisis, the nation has to stand together with sincerity of purpose without any hidden agenda of political parties to give peace a chance.


*Reel heroes Trump reel heroes*

As we honourably and gracefully withdraw from a about to begin legal battle with a star couple who had made an inadvertent attempt to touch the honour of the Armed Forces Personnel by trying to auction a piece of costume in the guise of “Uniform”. The entire closure of the “issue” has  happened at our terms and conditions!!
Here are some developments and lessons learned (post they were served with legal notice)
1. Both Twinkle Khanna and Akshey Kumar have disassociated themselves from the activities of Salt scout (the company doing the online auction).
2. Their counsel has responded to the legal notice on their behalf and said the following quote  *our client is not conducting any auction nor is alleged auction being conducted on behalf of our client or our client’s wife. Our client states that the uniform costume worn by our client is neither owned by our client nor by client’s wife nor is it bestowed upon or handed over or conferred upon our client in any manner whatsoever* unquote 
3. That pretty much means they have developed “cold feet” after realising that they are doing something which is both illegal and unethical. 
4. Salt scout has on their part were left high and dry as their protagonist had pulled the rug from under their feet….Salt scout all of a sudden did not have legs to stand on…they of course felt cheated….Salt scout immediately (through their counsel) apologised and have now added a fine print calling it as  “Naval costume worn by Akshey himself in movie Rustam” on their auction webpages. The company is now auctioning only the pant, shirt and the cap (minus the ribbons/medals and rank).
5. We had nothing against anyone…. it was only our honour which remains non negotiable…..if we will not stand up and be counted….if we will not stand up and speak up then we have no right of cribbing that we do not get our rightful due in the society….. or India Today magazine has gumption to show our Chief’s uniform with pockets inside out on their cover….. someone has to take bull by the horn!!!…no one *repeat* no should touch the honour of the only institution which keep this country together…..
….and we repeat Lt Col Sandeep Ahlawat’s now iconic phrase ….. you touch our honour we will give you a bloody nose!!! (resounding defeat)

 

 

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IB: Khalistan groups hiring criminals to revive militancy

IB: Khalistan groups hiring criminals to revive militancy

Mukesh Ranjan

Tribune News Service

New Delhi, May 13

Noting that Pakistan’s intelligence agency ISI has been active in Punjab and providing all kinds of logistic and financial support, the Intelligence Bureau (IB) in its report to the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) has said that pro-Khalistan groups are hiring local criminals to carry out terror activities and revive militancy in the state.Suggesting that local police officers, district magistrates and senior IAS and IPS officers should be alerted about the covert activities of pro-Khalistani groups, the IB in its report, according to a senior MHA official, has cautioned the state government that some local gangsters “are in constant touch with pro-Khalistan groups” which have a presence in many Western countries.It is also learnt that in the report, the IB has asked the MHA to issue directions to the state government to make a list of local criminals and keep a watch on them.A senior MHA official said, “Intelligence inputs have revealed that a pro-Khalistan group from the UK has started a campaign through social media urging the people of Punjab to join the Khalistan struggle. They are hiring local gangsters to neutralise people and leaders opposing the Khalistan struggle.”These groups are allegedly sending money to the criminals via hawala to carry out terror activities. In this exercise, they are getting proactive support from Pakistan’s ISI, the IB has claimed in its report.Sources in the MHA said the report mentions that such groups, which are operating from European countries, are luring criminals and anti-social elements by offering education and job opportunities to their family members abroad. Intelligence input suggests that around 100 people related to these local criminals have moved out of India to greener pastures in Europe.The NIA, which is probing the murder case of local RSS leader Ravinder Gosain, had last week filed a chargesheet accusing 15 who belonged to the Khalistan Liberation Front (KLF). In the chargesheet, the agency had also said the killing of the RSS leader was a transnational conspiracy hatched by the KLF’s senior leadership.Alert sounded

  • The Intelligence Bureau (IB) has cautioned the state government that some local gangsters “are in constant touch with pro-Khalistan groups” which have a presence in many Western countries
  • It has also asked the MHA to direct the state to make a list of local criminals and gangsters and keep a watch on them