Sanjha Morcha

Can truce along LoC be restored? by Lt-Gen Syed Ata Hasnain (retd)

A good beginning may be made by agreeing to establish a line of communication between important sectors and formations on the LoC to allow interaction between field commanders.

Can truce along LoC be restored?

Lt-Gen Syed Ata Hasnain (retd)THE nearest to an official and written ceasefire agreement at the LoC is only enshrined in the subtext of the Simla Agreement of July 2, 1972. However, since then, LoC soldiering has assumed a different colour. It’s not just about preserving the ‘sanctity of the LoC’ with Pakistan, an adage well known to Indian Army officers; it’s much to do with proving a couple of points.  First, which is the more macho Army and, by extension, the more macho nation? Second, which is the more professional army? Yet, more importantly, it’s all about ‘moral ascendancy’. I can’t remember a definition of the term in any Indian Army publication; perhaps the Pakistanis may be having something of their own. Nevertheless, since it is a task spelt out to every LoC commander, it does deserve an analysis of its interpretation and what affect that has on the attitude towards and manifestation of ceasefire.On the face of it, moral ascendancy is all about being professionally more competent than your adversary. However, the most important aspect is motivation and morale. There are increasing instances in which units of the two armies, which faced each other in Siachen or later days of Kargil 1999, are coming back face to face once again at the LoC. The antipathy then was much higher. All this is fine. It’s when the lead begins to fly around that problems arise. Even worse, when rogue actions from across the LoC  involve bestial acts such as beheading, they have to be responded to. Otherwise, the moral ascendancy slips and that’s not acceptable by a mile or more.It’s not as if ceasefire infringements commenced only in 1989, the year when Pakistan decided to launch its proxy war to exploit the fast-track changes the world was then undergoing. The moral ascendancy game was in play through the late seventies and eighties, but with one difference: there was no infiltration of terrorists. Immediately after 1989, the LoC got associated primarily with infiltration; terror sponsors in Pakistan found that the simplest way of forcing gaps in deployment to effect infiltration was to push Indian ambushes, deployed in the open, into their posts which had overhead protection (OHP) from fire. Even with the construction of the LoC fence, although partial OHP exists at ambush sites, it is the resultant chaos from shelling and small arms fire that assists in infiltration.On November 26, 2003, Pakistan took a decision to vigorously implement the ceasefire and abide by it. Although it appeared unilateral and India has never made it look any different, the truth is that some behind-the-scene parleys did assist in reaching that stage where Pakistan could announce its ‘offer’. There was no official document signed by the two sides, although recorded announcements to abide by it made it appear as a de facto agreement. Infiltration attempts continued as before, but at reduced levels. Why President Musharraf accepted, or as claimed, even initiated the ‘proper implementation’ of the 1972 ceasefire remains a mystery to the day. Analysis of initiatives which characterised the Vajpayee premiership is a subject by itself, but there was a Vajpayee-Musharraf moment which captured the essence of what could have been the grounding for an improved Indo-Pak relationship. The ceasefire was probably the result of that. Many a Pakistani strategic analyst I have spoken with has failed to identify the Musharraf thought process. And Pervez Musharraf today is in search of another identity; he would preferably disassociate himself with the ceasefire.The LoC remained quiet almost till 2009 when one segment in the Krishna Ghati sector erupted and has never quieted thereafter. Siachen has remained a model of the ceasefire as much as has been Kargil. This gives weight to the argument that breaches of ceasefire take place in infiltration-prone areas because there is no infiltration in the Ladakh zone. Paradoxically, larger attempts at infiltration have been made in the Machil, Keran, Tangdhar and Lipa sectors of the Valley, but very few breaches of ceasefire have occurred there. In recent years, the major LoC exchanges have all been south of the Pir Panjal and along the International Border (IB), the latter being held by the BSF. The area has little terrorist presence, but some sleeper agents continue to exist. However, the area is more vulnerable to transient terror through infiltration of suicide squads (fidayeen) due to the shorter distances and potential of single-night operations. Currently, the prime reasons for the breach of ceasefire by the Pakistani side revolve around a few factors. Firstly, infiltration continues to play a role, irrespective of the explanations above. 2 Secondly, the LoC offers the easiest location for the demonstration of violence for the international community to take note that the J&K conflict continues to fester; it is Pakistan’s abiding interest to prove this despite being a signatory to the bilateral clause of the Simla Agreement. Earlier, major terror attacks sponsored by Pakistan preceded big ticket events such as high-profile international visits to South Asia or even the annual UN General Assembly session. With better Indian control over J&K, it isn’t easy to do that; the LoC becomes the next best symbol for demonstration. Thirdly, the Hindu populated areas of the Jammu IB or LoC belt get targeted to cause more angst within J&K and, indeed, within India and enhance the communal temperature to Pakistani advantage. Fourthly, Pakistani friendly jihadi elements such as the Jaish-e-Mohammad (JeM) and Lashkar-e-Taiyaba (LeT) maintain their relevance through shallow infiltration and attempted terrorist actions against objectives closer to the LoC, as shown by the Uri and Mohra attacks in the Jhelum Valley. Lastly, with increasing political ambitions of the jihadi groups of Hafiz Sayeed and Masood Azhar, spectacular acts at the LoC or deeper in the hinterland will continue so as to draw attention and attraction.In the light of the history of the ceasefire, the fact that it hardly exists today and the harder response by India without remorse, the feasibility of returning to 2003 remains remote. It could have happened with PM Modi’s initiative of December 25, 2015, or may still find life in a sudden unprovoked peace-related trigger. The advantage of keeping the LoC hot finds favour with Pakistan, but once a threshold is crossed, India will not disfavour a more robust response. Pakistan’s intent is to somehow bring the UN military observers into the scene so as to internationalise the issue and rescind the provisions of the Simla Agreement. The initiative for the ceasefire cannot come from India because the triggers come from Pakistan. It is up to Gen Qamar Bajwa to find his own moment if peace is to return to the LoC; the chances of that in 2018 appear more remote than ever. A good beginning may be made by agreeing to establish a line of communication between important sectors and formations on the LoC to allow interaction between field commanders.


LIST OF AWARDEE ON REPUBLIC DAY 2018

PARAM VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-35479Y LT GEN BALWANT SINGH NEGI, UYSM, YSM, SM, VSM**, INF
2. IC-35796A LT GEN KANWAL JEET SINGH GILL, AVSM, VSM, EME (RETD)
3. IC-35904Y LT GEN SARATH CHAND, UYSM, AVSM, VSM, INF
4. IC-35919F LT GEN AMARJEET SINGH, AVSM**, SM, INF
5. IC-35923K LT GEN JAGBIR SINGH CHEEMA, AVSM, VSM, INF (RETD)
6. IC-35960X LT GEN SHRAVAN KUMAR PATYAL, UYSM, SM, INF
7. IC-35965W LT GEN RAJENDRA RAMRAO NIMBHORKAR, UYSM, AVSM, SM**, VSM, INF
8. IC-35987P LT GEN DEWAN RABINDRANATH SONI, VSM, ARMD
9. IC-38311X LT GEN SATISH KUMAR DUA, UYSM, SM, VSM, INF
10. IC-38654N LT GEN DEVRAJ ANBU, UYSM, AVSM, YSM, SM, INF
11. IC-38679A LT GEN ABHAY KRISHNA, UYSM, AVSM, SM, VSM, INF
12. IC-38722W LT GEN CHERISH MATHSON, SM, VSM, INF
13. IC-39083M LT GEN SANJAY KUMAR JHA, AVSM, YSM, SM, INF
14. IC-39098P LT GEN GURPRATAP SINGH DHILLON, AVSM, YSM, SM, INF
15. IC-39295X LT GEN PARMINDER JIT SINGH PANNU, AVSM, VSM, INF
16. IC-39818L LT GEN SURESH SHARMA, AVSM, ENGRS
17. MR-03992M LT GEN ARUP KUMAR DAS, AMC
18. IC-38691F MAJ GEN JATINDER SINGH BEDI, ARTY (RETD)
19. IC-40700W MAJ GEN SANJAY THAPA, ARTY

KIRTI CHAKRA

1. IC-66219P MAJ VIJAYANT BIST, JAK LI

UTTAM YUDH SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-38753W LT GEN JASWINDER SINGH SANDHU, AVSM, VSM, INF
2. IC-39185H LT GEN AJAE KUMAR SHARMA, YSM, SM, INF
3. IC-39465W LT GEN AMARJEET SINGH BEDI, YSM, VSM, INF
4. IC-39492A LT GEN ANIL CHAUHAN, AVSM, SM, VSM, INF

BAR TO ATI VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-35962H LT GEN LALIT KUMAR PANDEY, AVSM, SM, INF (RETD)
2. IC-39070P LT GEN RANBIR SINGH, AVSM, YSM, SM, INF

ATI VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-35201X LT GEN AJAI KUMAR SAHGAL, VSM, AAD (RETD)
2. IC-35955M LT GEN AMRIK SINGH, SM, INF
3. IC-37398X LT GEN RAJAN RAVINDRAN, VSM, INF
4. IC-39073H LT GEN SANJEEV KUMAR SHRIVASTAVA, ENGRS
5. IC-39130Y LT GEN RAJEEV CHOPRA, INF
6. IC-39140H LT GEN PARMINDER SINGH JAGGI, AAD
7. IC-39283H LT GEN KANWAL KUMAR, ARMY AVN
8. IC-39380A LT GEN PODALI SHANKAR RAJESHWAR, VSM, ARTY
9. IC-39436F LT GEN SATINDER KUMAR SAINI, YSM, VSM, INF
10. IC-39624H LT GEN PRADEEP M BALI, VSM, INF
11. IC-39675W LT GEN VIJAY SINGH, SM, VSM, INF
12. IC-39871W LT GEN SANTOSH KUMAR UPADHYA, SM, VSM, INF
13. IC-39898N LT GEN DEPINDER SINGH AHUJA, ENGRS
14. IC-40031H LT GEN SANJEEV KANAL, ARTY
15. IC-40101W LT GEN RAJNI KANT JAGGA, VSM, ARMD
16. IC-40235P LT GEN GOPAL R, SM, INF
17. IC-40753P LT GEN MANMOHAN JEET SINGH KAHLON, ARMD
18. V-000359F LT GEN AMOLOK JIT SINGH, VSM, RVC
19. MR-04142P LT GEN SANJEEV CHOPRA, VSM, AMC
20. IC-40795F MAJ GEN SANJEEV NARAIN, INF
21. IC-40873N MAJ GEN RAMACHANDRA NAGRAJ, VSM, SIGS
22. IC-41072Y MAJ GEN RAJEEV SIROHI, VSM, INF
23. IC-41166W MAJ GEN SATINDER SINGH, AAD
24. IC-41183W MAJ GEN SURESH CHANDRA MOHANTY, GUARDS
25. IC-41860H MAJ GEN SHANTANU DAYAL, SM, VSM, INF
26. IC-42004X MAJ GEN RANA PRATAP KALITA, SM, VSM, INF
27. IC-42389A MAJ GEN BAGGAVALLI SOMASHEKAR RAJU, YSM, INF
28. IC-45050X MAJ GEN TEJBIR SINGH, SM, INF
29. MR-05596P MAJ GEN MADHURI KANITKAR, VSM, AMC
30. IC-49650X BRIG GAMBHIR SINGH, GARH RIF

SHAURYA CHAKRA

1. IC-76619P MAJ AKHIL RAJ RV, GRENADIERS
2. IC-76020F CAPT ROHIT SHUKLA, RAJPUT 
3. SS-44764Y CAPT ABHINAV SHUKLA, PARA (SF) 
4. TA-42759Y CAPT PRADEEP SHOURY ARYA, INF BN (TA) PARA ATT WITH PARA (SF) 
5. 2691007Y HAV MUBARIK ALI, GRENADIERS 
6. 5047762N HAV RABINDRA THAPA, GR 
7. 13625628L NK NARENDER SINGH, PARA (SF) 
8. 9109592Y L/NK BADHER HUSSAIN, Inf 
9. 13630400Y PTR MANCHU, PARA (SF)

YUDH SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-42336F MAJ GEN AJAI KUMAR SINGH, SM, VSM, INF
2. IC-48579H BRIG CHARANJEET SINGH DEWGUN, GR
3. IC-48681L BRIG RAGHAVACHARI SANTHANA RAMAN, Inf
4. IC-49189M BRIG NAGENDRA SINGH, SM, Inf
5. IC-49500F BRIG ABHIJIT SURENDRA PENDHARKAR, ASSAM
6. IC-49588W BRIG MOHINDER PAL SINGH, SM, JAK RIF
7. IC-50080Y BRIG YASHPAL SINGH AHLAWAT, SM, MADRAS
8. IC-56428Y COL MOHINDER KUMAR SHAN, JAK LI
9. IC-60233L COL SHARANG PUN, GR
10. IC-60253Y COL KAMAL NAURIYAL, GRENADIERS


SENA MEDAL (GALLANTRY)

1. IC-56328N COL CHARANPREET SINGH, JAK RIF
2. IC-63279Y LT COL PRAVEEN MADHAV KHANZODE, INT 
3. IC-65402L LT COL ASHUTOSH SHARMA, GUARDS
4. IC-64017P MAJ TEJAS B CANDADE, PARA (SF)
5. IC-66253P MAJ RAJAT VYAS, SIKH LI
6. IC-67758X MAJ SAMEER BANSAL, PARA (SF)
7. IC-68144F MAJ NISHIT KASHYAP, PUNJAB
8. IC-70493K MAJ SANDEEP THAPA, ARTY
9. IC-71397F MAJ AKSHAY CHAUBEY, ASC 
10. IC-71931N MAJ SUKHWINDER SINGH, ASC
11. IC-72229P MAJ KARTIKEYA MANRAL, KUMAON
12. IC-72351L MAJ KULDEEP SINGH, RAJ RIF
13. IC-72759K MAJ SACHIN SINGH RAWAT, ASSAM
14. IC-73342W MAJ VIPUL NARAYAN, GRENADIERS 
15. IC-75017P MAJ SIDDHARTH KUMAR NAYAK, ARTY
16. IC-75423P MAJ NITESH KUMAR,PARA (SF)
17. IC-75775M MAJ K NAVEEN REDDY, ENGRS
18. IC-76440F MAJ TASOU PRAO, JAK RIF
19. IC-79137L MAJ NINGTHOUJAM MAKJAL SINGH GR
20. SS-43376P MAJ VARUN SINGH SLATHIA, SIKH LI 
21. SS-43634K MAJ VIKRAM SINGH, ASC
22. IC-75931L CAPT ABHISHEK KUMAR, MECH INF
23. IC-76434N CAPT NAVEEN SIGER, PARA (SF)
24. IC-76546N CAPT DAVINDER PAL SINGH, MAHAR
25. IC-77276W CAPT SAHIL BHARDWAJ, SIKH LI
26. IC-77396P CAPT DUSHYANT SINGH, ARMD
27. IC-77896M CAPT MANISH KUMAR SINGH, PARA (SF)
28. IC-78776A CAPT DIVYANSHU AHUJA, ENGRS
29. IC-80335H CAPT DUOMAI SHOZII PAOSHO, MADRAS 
30. SS-44861W CAPT KAUSTUBH PRAKASHKUMAR RANE, GARH RIF
31. SS-47582W CAPT PRANAY PANWAR, SIKH 
32. SS-47917H CAPT PRANSHU MAURYA, GR
33. SS-48221K CAPT PRABHAKAR DEV SINGH, DOGRA 
34. JC-431089M SUB SHASHI KUMAR, PUNJAB (POSTHUMOUS)
35. JC-460076X SUB RAMESH KUMAR, MARATHA LI
36. JC-471297K SUB JAIVIR SINGH, RAJ RIF
37. JC-612987A SUB MANISH GURUNG, GR
38. JC-413919P NB SUB ASHOK KUMAR, PARA (SF)
39. JC-414162K NB SUB SUNIL KUMAR, PARA (SF)
40. 2493054L HAV BALWANT SINGH, PARA (SF)
41. 2494144Y HAV VIJAY KUMAR, PARA (SF)
42. 2791742K HAV KARAMBHALKAR RAJARAM TUKARAM, MARATHA LI
43. 4079429M HAV AVTAR SINGH, GARH RIF
44. 4272189F HAV PRABHU SAHAY TIRKEY, BIHAR (POSTHUMOUS)
45. 4275229H HAV SHEW SHANKAR CHAUDHARI, BIHAR
46. 4366524Y HAV RONGSEN SASHI, PARA (SF)
47. 4569674K HAV VINOD KUMAR, MAHAR
48. 13622774A HAV LAXMAN SINGH, PARA (SF)
49. 13757526X HAV JALIL AHMED, JAK LI
50. 15561142H HAV BHAG SINGH, ENGRS
51. 2802845L NK JADHAV SANDIP SARJERAO, MARATHA LI (POSTHUMOUS)
52. 2895878A NK VIKASH KUMAR, RAJ RIF
53. 3002654L NK BALATTAR SINGH, RAJPUT
54. 4482042H NK JALOUR SINGH, SIKH LI
55. 5049253N NK BADRI BAHADUR GURUNG, GR 
56. 9423262K NK DEEPAK KUMAR, GR
57. 13625783M NK TILAK RAJ, PARA (SF)
58. 13764688L NK GAGANDEEP SINGH, JAK LI
59. 13767229X NK PURSHOTAM KUMAR, PARA (SF)
60. 13769548H NK VIRENDER SINGH, PARA (SF)
61. 15140481F NK BALAUR SINGH, ARTY
62. 2698814W L/NK NARESH KUMAR, GREN 
63. 2698879K L/NK BABU LAL, GREN
64. 13626753F L/NK RAJPATI SHAHNI, PARA (SF)
65. 14934920W L/NK AJAY SINGH PARIHAR, MECH INF
66. 15621397P L/NK VIPIN KUMAR, GUARDS
67. 2498961P SEP JASPAL SINGH, PUNJAB
68. 2502154A SEP SUKHRAJ SINGH, PUNJAB
69. 2813048A SEP KHARADE SANDIP KAILAS, MARATHA LI
70. 2813791P SEP MANE SAVAN BALKU, MARATHA LI (POSTHUMOUS)
71. 4376797P SEP NZAN LOTHA, ASSAM
72. 4377488Y SEP MILI KAMBU, ASSAM
73. 4379692W SEP RIKPE TAIPODIA, ASSAM
74. 4487592P SEP MANINDER SINGH, SIKH LI
75. 4491739X SEP JASPREET SINGH, SIKH LI (POSTHUMOUS)
76. 4584321F SEP GAWAI SUMEDH WAMAN, MAHAR (POSTHUMOUS)
77. 4585664K SEP ILAYARAJA P, MAHAR(POSTHUMOUS)
78. 9107784X SEP MOHD RAFIQ, JAK LI
79. 14705398M SEP THANGCHONLEN, ASSAM
80. 19002288P SEP AVTAR SINGH, SIKH 
81. 15233495N GNR BANWARI LAL, ARTY
82. 15234255H GNR SITA RAM, ARTY
83. 4088047K RFN YOGHESH SINGH, GARH RIF
84. 4094703W RFN SACHIN SINGH RANA, GARH RIF
85. 9112935P RFN JAWEED AHMAD SHEIKH, JAK LI 
86. 15503957Y SWR NARESH KUMAR SINGH, ARMD

SENA MEDAL (DISTINGUISHED)

1. IC-39106H MAJ GEN PANKAJ ARORA, ARTY (RETD)
2. IC-39457X MAJ GEN MOHANDEEP SINGH GHURA, VSM, INF
3. IC-39696M MAJ GEN JACOB THARAKAN CHACKO, AOC
4. IC-40804X MAJ GEN DIG VIJAY SETIA, VSM, ENGRS
5. IC-45022L MAJ GEN KANWAR MANMEET SINGH, ARTY
6. IC-42857P BRIG GURVIR SINGH KAHLON, PUNJAB, HQ IDS
7. IC-42919K BRIG MANOJ KUMAR, ARTY,
8. IC-43407K BRIG SURENDER PAVAMANI, ARTY, DDG EM(A)
9. IC-44057P BRIG RAJIV MANKOTIA, VSM, GR, DDG (PROC)
10. IC-45524N BRIG VISHWANATHAN VENKAT SUBRAMANIAM, MECH INF
11. IC-45577M BRIG GAUTAM GANGULY, VSM, GRENADIERS, HQ CTF
12. IC-47023M BRIG NAVNEET SINGH SARNA, ARTY, 
13. IC-48518L BRIG MOHIT MALHOTRA, ARMD
14. IC-48970A BRIG VIKRAM NAGPAL, GRENADIERS
15. IC-49151H BRIG RAJA CHAKRABORTY, BIHAR
16. IC-49472A BRIG SATISH DAHIYA, SIKH LI
17. IC-49480Y BRIG ROHIT CHOUDHARY, MARATHA LI
18. IC-49525N BRIG RAJESH SRIVASTAVA, ARTY, 
19. MR-05971P BRIG HARISHANKER AGRAWAL, VSM, AMC
20. IC-50785L COL ANIL JOHN ALFRED PEREIRA, SIGS 
21. IC-51018Y COL UMAID SINGH RATHORE, VSM, ARMY AVN
22. IC-53119L COL RAKESH NAIR, GR 
23. IC-53168N COL PRASHANT GANPATRAO SANKPAL, GARH RIF 
24. IC-54647F COL MELEVEETIL RAJIV MENON, MADRAS
25. IC-56330L COL VIKRAM JEET SINGH, KUMAON
26. IC-56441H COL IMON MUKHERJEE, MAHAR
27. IC-57836W COL BEERINDER SINGH SANDHU, MADRAS
28. IC-58679F COL SUVRAT CHATURVEDI, INT
29. IC-59088M COL VIJAY KUMAR SHARMA, GR
30. IC-59674P COL ASHOK PALIATH ACHUTHAN, SIKH LI
31. IC-60092F COL DHARMENDRA YADAV, SIKH LI
32. IC-64826P COL HARMANDEEP SINGH GREWAL, PUNJAB
33. IC-64859A COL VISHAL SINGH, JAK RIF
34. IC-56511W LT COL NAVEEN GAHLAWAT, INT 
35. IC-61399Y LT COL ANIL MEHTA, ARMY AVN
36. IC-62033N LT COL INDERJOT SINGH MANN, ARMD
37. IC-63479P LT COL RAJENDER SINGH JAMWAL, ARMY AVN
38. IC-70447P MAJ PRAVEEN KUMAR SINGH, ARMY AVN

BAR TO SENA MEDAL (DISTINGUISHED)

1. IC-45009F MAJ GEN SUKHDEEP SANGWAN, SM, INF
2. IC-58605M COL DHEERAJ KOTWAL, SM, SIKH LI

VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-37882K MAJ GEN DALIP SINGH, AOC
2. IC-39229P MAJ GEN DEVESH AGNIHOTRI, MECH INF
3. IC-39472M MAJ GEN JITENDRA KUMAR MARWAL, INF
4. IC-39812K MAJ GEN GIRISH KUMAR, ENGRS
5. IC-40757L MAJ GEN VIKAL SAHNI, SM, INF 
6. IC-41196N MAJ GEN SUDHAKAR JEE, INF
7. IC-41509F MAJ GEN KANWAL JEET SINGH DHILLON, YSM, INF
8. IC-41702N MAJ GEN ML MOHAN BABU, ARTY
9. IC-42079P MAJ GEN JITENDRA KUMAR SHUKLA, AAD
10. IC-43630N MAJ GEN SURESH MENON, SIGS
11. IC-45193X MAJ GEN ATUL KAUSHIK, SM, INF 
12. MR-04569Y MAJ GEN GAUTAM GANGULY, AMC
13. IC-40710A BRIG SURENDRA MEHTA, GR
14. IC-41927W BRIG SHIVENDER SINGH, YSM, GARH RIF
15. IC-42270W BRIG KAMAL KUMAR REPSWAL, SM, ENGRS
16. IC-42283N BRIG GURJEET SINGH KAMBO, ENGRS
17. IC-42782H BRIG DEEPAK OBHRAI, ARTY 
18. IC-42794X BRIG MV SUCHINDRA KUMAR, YSM, ASSAM
19. IC-43262K BRIG ARUN ANANTHANARAYAN, YSM, SM, GREN
20. IC-43395A BRIG MANOJ KUMAR BINDAL, AAD
21. IC-43843F BRIG ADISH YADAV, RAJ RIF
22. IC-43998W BRIG VIJAY RAMCHANDRA DESHMUKH, EME
23. IC-44055K BRIG VINOD MOHAN CHANDRAN, ARMD
24. IC-44082N BRIG ANEEL RAJ SINGH KAHLON, ARMD
25. IC-44474F BRIG RITU RAJ RAINA, SM, DOGRA
26. IC-45642F BRIG VENKATESHA REDDY G A, SC, JAT
27. IC-47002W BRIG JAGJIT SINGH MANGAT, ARMD
28. IC-47372W BRIG RAJ RISHI SHARMA, ARTY
29. IC-47657H BRIG MICHAEL AJ FERNANDEZ, ENGRS
30. IC-47994X BRIG J KAMESWARA RAO, ENGRS
31. IC-48044P BRIG SUKRITI SINGH DAHIYA, ENGRS 
32. IC-48539F BRIG ANIMISH SURESH RANADE, PARA
33. IC-48551H BRIG KISHAN PAL SINGH SIROHI, GUARDS
34. IC-48955N BRIG VIKRAM VARMA, ARMD
35. IC-49036H BRIG VIJAI SINGH RANA, MECH INF
36. IC-49048X BRIG RAKESH MANOCHA, SM, GRENADIERS
37. IC-49095P BRIG AMAR NATH KUKRETI, SM, GRENADIERS
38. IC-49496K BRIG PREET PAL SINGH, GR 
39. IC-49510L BRIG HITESH BHALLA, SC**, SM, MARATHA LI
40. IC-49794A BRIG KULDIP PATHAK, SM, MADRAS
41. MR-05069N BRIG SITARAM GHOSH, AMC
42. MR-05521X BRIG KAVITA SAHAI, AMC
43. IC-51475M COL AMIT TALWAR, ARMD
44. IC-52570L COL HARBINDER SINGH BRAR, SIKH
45. IC-52865F COL HEMENDRA BHANDARI, SIKH
46. IC-52892L COL KARAN SINGH, RAJPUT
47. IC-53563F COL PADAM DEV THAKUR, GARH RIF
48. IC-53587L COL VIJAY NARAYAN SHUKLA, INT
49. IC-54165M COL NAVNEET BAKSHI, SM, MARATHA LI
50. IC-54737H COL ALOK SRIVASTAVA, ASC
51. IC-54874F COL ANIL DEV SWAMI, JAK RIF
52. IC-55212L COL NALINI RANJAN PANDEY, ARTY
53. IC-55867X COL SUNIL BHATT, GR
54. IC-56345N COL HIMANSHU RAWAT, GR
55. IC-57387M COL RISHI YADAVA, AOC
56. IC-57666X COL AJAY KUMAR SHARMA, ARTY
57. IC-57942P COL PRAVIN CHANDRA JOSHI, ARTY
58. IC-58466N COL KULWANT SINGH KUHAD, INT
59. IC-58675L COL RAMNATH SHANKAR, SIKH LI
60. IC-59159H COL MANEESH PARTHSARTHY, GR
61. IC-59464P COL DEEPANKAR DAS, PUNJAB
62. IC-59605Y COL GURKIRAN PAL SINGH, GARH RIF
63. IC-59684Y COL SUDIP MAJEE, SM, BIHAR REGT
64. IC-59898P COL LITTON DHAR, GR 
65. IC-60970M COL V SURESH KUMAR, BIHAR
66. MR-06245M COL ALOK BHALLA, AMC
67. IC-60747H LT COL S VENGATESAN, SIGS
68. MR-07286H LT COL RISHI DHILLAN, AMC
69. NR-19914Y LT COL SUSHMA THOMAS, MNS
70. SL-04681L LT COL NARESH KUMAR, GEN SER
71. IC-66933P MAJ ANUJ SAMAIYA, INT
72. TA-42967K CAPT NEIL SHAJI, INF BN (TA) PARA ATT WITH PARA (SF)
73. TJ-5363N SUB SHEIKH TAHIR, INF BN (TA) JAK LI
74. JC-561673N NB SUB SHOBHA KANT ROY, BIHAR REGT
75. JC-811984K NB SUB RAVINDER SINGH, INT

BAR TO VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-48507Y BRIG DUNDAYYA MALLIKARJUN PURVIMATH, VSM, ENGRS

 

 

 

 

 

MENTION-IN-DESPATCHES

OPERATION MEGHDOOT

1. IC-68691W MAJ PRASHANT DHUKIA, BIHAR

OPERATION RAKSHAK 

1. IC-63962Y LT COL PATIL SHREE VIKAS, INT
2. SS-44871A MAJ SUSHANT KASHYAP, ARMD
3. SS-46035P MAJ VIKAS TYAGI, INT
4. IC-70856H MAJ RAJIV KUMAR, ARTY 
5. IC-73066Y MAJ SIDDHARTHDEO SHARMA, ENGRS
6. IC-73396X MAJ PRANIT SINGH, RAJPUT
7. IC-76405Y MAJ AMAN KUMAR MALIK, SIGS
8. IC-76850X MAJ VINAY KUMAR, ARTY
9. SS-43753A MAJ AMIT KUMAR MISHRA, RAJPUT
10. SL-04897M MAJ SHIV KUMAR, ARTY 
11. SS-45964F CAPT PANKAJ BEHL, ARMD
12. JC-431198Y SUB RANJIV KUMAR, PUNJAB
13. JC-603225L NB SUB HARI KAJI GURUNG, GR
14. 14433932W RHM AJIT KUMAR, ARTY
15. 1494768P HAV GOVINDA BAHADUR KHARKA, ENGRS
16. 3402382K HAV MANJIT SINGH, SIKH
17. 3405930F NK GURPREET SINGH, SIKH 
18. 3408483N NK JASMINDER SINGH, SIKH 
19. 4194971P NK ANAND SINGH, KUMAON
20. 4571905N NK RAMESH ORAON, MAHAR
21. 5048631P NK KAYAR SINGH SARU, GR
22. 5757743H NK BAL BAHADUR PARIYAR, GR
23. 13624678K NK LAL SINGH, PARA (SF)
24. 13769292L NK SUNIL KUMAR, PARA (SF)
25. 5049519P NK DHAN BAHADUR DHENGA, GR
26. 2707505X SEP SUKHVINDER SINGH, GRENADIERS
27. 4287089N SEP PRAFULA KUMAR MALLICK, BIHAR
28. 4487553W SEP SHAMSHER SINGH, SIKH LI
29. 4488153W SEP GURPREET SINGH, SIKH LI
30. 20002892K SEP PRINCE JASWAL, DOGRA
31. 4096814M RFN KUSHAL SINGH, GARH RIF
32. 16020643F RFN PRAVANDH SINGH TOMAR, RAJ RIF
33. 4092077Y PTR LAXMAN SINGH RAWAT, PARA (SF)


No danger of war with India, says Pak PM

NEWDELHI: Pakistan Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi has said there is no danger of a war with India though both countries should ensure there is no escalation of the situation along the Line of Control (LoC) in Kashmir.

Abbasi, who was chosen as the premier by the ruling PML-N after the Supreme Court ousted Nawaz Sharif last year, also ruled out the possibility of action against Lashkar-e-Taiba founder Hafiz Saeed, saying there were no cases against him in Pakistan.

“I don’t think there is a danger of war, at least from our side, it isn’t there. Pakistan has never taken unilateral action, we have always demonstrated responsibility,” Abbasi said in an interview with Geo News channel that was aired on Tuesday night.

Responding to a question on the Indian Army chief’s remarks about calling Pakistan’s “nuclear bluff” and possible cross-border operations, Abbasi said: “The Indian Army chief will not speak in favour of us. It is a fact that Pakistan has nuclear capability and we have demonstrated it, and there is need for India to understand that (when) there are violations of the LoC, these things will not go without retaliation.

Referring to the Indian army chief’s remarks, he said, “If they believe on the other side there will be some political benefits and they keep making statements, as their military leadership has done, this has never been good for peace.”

Asked why no action was taken against Saeed despite pressure from India and the US, Abbasi said: “There is no case against Hafiz Saeed sab in Pakistan. If there was a case, action would be taken. This is an issue that comes to the fore repeatedly but there is no truth in it.”

Abbasi also said there has been no change in Pakistan’s stance that Kashmir remains the “core issue” with India. “We have always said the doors are open for talks but in a dignified and respectable manner, in which there can be meaningful dialogue without compromising on the core issue of Kashmir,” he said.


Ex-serviceman, sports quota in Class I, II jobs withdrawn

Pradeep Sharma

Tribune News Service

Chandigarh, January 25

In a major jolt to ex-servicemen and outstanding sportspersons aspiring for Class I and II jobs in Haryana, the state government has withdrawn its order on quota for them.According to an order issued by the Chief Secretary today, the instructions had been withdrawn from “date of its issuance (January 23, 2018)”.Though no official reason has been given for the withdrawal of the quota for the ESM and sportspersons, a senior government functionary told The Tribune that it had been done on account of certain ‘technical issues’.The state government would re-examine the issue and rectify the legal lacunae in the order so that there was no legal complications at a later stage, he said.Claiming that the state government was committed to providing quota to these two categories, the functionary asserted that the circular had been withdrawn for the “time being” and would be “re-issued” in due course after examining its legality.The Haryana Government had decided to provide 5 per cent horizontal reservation to ex-servicemen (ESM) and one per cent horizontal reservation to outstanding sportspersons in direct recruitment in the Class I and II jobsA circular issued by the Chief Secretary’s office had stated that in case no candidate was found suitable for appointment even on re-advertisement, the vacancies reserved for the ESM of a particular category would be filled from among the same category candidates.For example, if a suitable candidate belonging to the SC is not available in the ESM category, the post could be filled from among the candidates of the SC. The same condition would apply to other categories

Why no quota

  • Though no official reason has been given for the withdrawal of the quota for the ESM and sportspersons, a senior government functionary told The Tribune that it had been done on account of certain ‘technical issues’.

When an Indian Army contingent was invited to visit Britain in 1919

On 19 July 1919, there was a large Victory Parade through the streets of London to mark the end of the First World War. Around 15,000 troops led by the Allied commanders marched to the cheers of thousands of spectators. Bands played in London’s parks, and a memorial to those killed and wounded was unveiled in Whitehall.

The Indian Army had been invited to send a representative contingent to take part in the parade, but problems with shipping and an outbreak of influenza, prevented the contingent from arriving in time. Instead, it was decided that the Indian contingent would have its own Victory March through London as an acknowledgement of the vital role the Indian Armed Forces had played during the War.

Indian Contingent (Sikhs) passing along the Mall. Photo credit:  © IWM (Q 14954)
Indian Contingent (Sikhs) passing along the Mall. Photo credit: © IWM (Q 14954)

The India Office Records has a number of files on the arrangements for the Peace Contingent’s visit to England, which make fascinating reading. The Contingent consisted of a British detachment of 11 officers and 270 men, an Indian Army detachment of 27 British officers, 465 Indian officers and 985 Indian other ranks, and 34 Imperial Service troops of the Indian Native States. The Contingent arrived in the camp at Hampton Court on 26 July.

Photo credit: British Library/IOR/L/MIL/7/5873
Photo credit: British Library/IOR/L/MIL/7/5873
Photo credit: British Library/IOR/L/MIL/7/5873
Photo credit: British Library/IOR/L/MIL/7/5873

The procession on August 2 started at Waterloo Station, continued across Westminster Bridge, along Whitehall, and up the Mall to Buckingham Palace. The King inspected the Contingent on the East lawn of the Palace, and presented some awards, including the Victoria Cross to Naik Karanbahadur Rana of the 2nd/3rd Gurkha Rifles. The King then gave a speech thanking the men for their service during the War, which was repeated in Urdu by General Sir Frederick Campbell. The troops were then given tea before returning to their camp.

Photo credit: British Library/IOR/L/MIL/7/5873
Photo credit: British Library/IOR/L/MIL/7/5873

After the King’s inspection the British troops were demobilised, but the Indian troops stayed for several weeks camped at Hampton Court. The troops were entertained with outdoor games and sports and in the evenings lectures were given, and a cinema was established by the Young Men’s Christian Association. Groups of officers and men were taken on day trips to London and other parts of Britain.

These trips included a bombing display by the Royal Air Force, the steel works of Vickers Ltd in Sheffield, the shipyards of John Brown and the Fairfield Engineering Works on the Clyde and Portsmouth Dockyard. In London trips were organised to the Houses of Parliament, Tower of London, Kew Gardens, St Paul’s Cathedral, and also to some schools. There were also regular shopping trips to the West End.

Photo credit: British Library/IOR/L/MIL/7/5873
Photo credit: British Library/IOR/L/MIL/7/5873
Photo credit: British Library/London Bus Guide 1919 IOR/L/MIL/7/5873
Photo credit: British Library/London Bus Guide 1919 IOR/L/MIL/7/5873

The Peace Contingent left for India in the middle of September 1919, and the India Office marked the occasion by issuing a souvenir book, beautifully illustrated by the artist W Luker Jnr.

Photo credit: British Library/IOR/L/MIL/17/5/2420
Photo credit: British Library/IOR/L/MIL/17/5/2420

This article first appeared on the British Library’s Asian and African Studies blog.


Army job aspirants hijack train, rlys yet to take action

TROUBLE Candidates allegedly misbehaved during trip

BHOPAL: Candidates appearing for the army recruitment drive in Gwalior for the past week have hijacked a train, misbehaved with passengers, vandalised railway property and are also travelling for free, railway officials said. But, no action has been taken against them as railways feared that it will create law and order problem.

HT FILE■ Around 60,000 candidates are taking part in the army recruitment from January 8 to 22, and most of them are travelling by train.The recruitment drive is taking place from January 8 to 22, in which approximately 60,000 candidates are participating, and most of them are travelling by train. Maximum trouble was reported from Guna-Gwalior section on the first day of the drive when the railways appeared illprepared for the sudden influx of thousands of candidates.

On January 11, hundreds of candidates boarded the train meant for passengers of Mukhya Mantri Teerth Darshan Yojna, which was going from Shivpuri in Madhya Pradesh to Rameshwaram. When the train entered Guna station, the candidates barged into it and forced the driver to take the train back to Shivpuri, about 100km north. Railway officials said the candidates wanted to take it to Gwalior, but the RPF used mild force to get the train vacated in Shivpuri.

IA Suddiqui, public relation officer, West Central Railways, said, “When the candidates were forced to vacate at Shivpuri, all of them fled from the spot, so no FIR was registered. Our main aim was to ensure the train started back on its route and there was no law and order problem.”

The railways’ problems did not end there as candidates entered into most of the other trains travelling on the route without ticket and even occupied the women’s and AC coaches, creating ruckus. Other passengers were outnumbered and, in most cases, there were too few security men to control the situation, officials said.

Siddiqui said, “It was very difficult for the RPF to control so many people. It is true that they even occupied AC coaches, but tackling them with brute force would have created an ugly situation as there were too many of them and we had to think of the passengers’ safety.”

A resident of Shivpuri, Sunita Agrawal, 42, was travelling alone in the Indore-Amritsar Express. “When the train reached Guna, a large number of young boys entered the coach. The train was jam-packed. They were laughing, abusing and misbehaving with passengers but we were helpless. My two-hour journey to Shivpuri was horrible,” she said.

Direct Army Recruitment, Gwalior, director, Col Manish Chaturvedi said they had written to the railways to introduce some trains especially for the candidates but the request was not looked into. “It is the duty of district administration to make all the arrangements. They invite us to organise the rally. We had written to the railways to run special trains for 15 days so that passengers of other trains don’t have to face trouble. But railways didn’t do anything,” Chaturvedi said.

On why the railway did not run special trains, Siddiqui said, “Due to some communication problem, it could not be worked out …”

However, other railway officials said running a train with 18 bogies costs between ~4.5 to ~6 lakh per day.

“The army told us to take money from the candidates. But it is a normal practice of candidates appearing for such exams not to purchase tickets, and we too look the other way as most candidates are poor,” a railway official said, requesting anonymity. A district administration official, however, blamed both railways and army for the chaos, saying no prior necessary arrangements were made. “Guna is not well connected with Gwalior.

When the army and Railways knew that thousands of candidates would be travelling every day, they should have made necessary arrangements,” said a district administration officer.


May lose IAF job if tattoo: HC

New Delhi, January 28Tattoo-sporting candidates cannot be guaranteed a job in the Indian Air Force (IAF).This stipulation has now got judicial stamp with the Delhi High Court upholding the decision of the Air Force cancelling a man’s appointment for the post of airman as he had carved a permanent tattoo on the external side of his forearm.The Air Force grants relaxation and permits certain kind of tattoos, including in case of tribals, which are as per customs and traditions.A Bench of Justices Hima Kohli and Rekha Palli, however, noted that the tattoo engraved on the body of the candidate was not in conformity with the relaxation granted by the IAF and he had also failed to submit a photograph of his tattoo at the time of submitting his application, as prescribed in the advertisement issued by the IAF.The counsel for the IAF clarified that only a permanent body tattoo on the inner face of forearms, reverse side of palm; and in case of tribals, tattoos as per their customs, were permitted.


BSF, Pak Rangers hold flag meeting

BSF, Pak Rangers hold flag meeting
BSF DIG, Jammu sector, PS Dhiman and Chenab Rangers Sector Commander Brig Amjad Hussain during a flag meeting in Suchetgarh on Thursday. Tribune photo

Amir Karim Tantray

Tribune News Service

Jammu, January 25

To ease the tension along the International Border, the Border Security Force (BSF) and Pakistan Rangers today held a sector commander-level flag meeting at the octroi post of the Suchetgarh sector in Jammu.During the half-an-hour meeting, held at the request of Pakistan Rangers, the BSF raised the issue of recent unprovoked ceasefire violations by Rangers which killed seven civilians and two BSF personnel.Giving details, a BSF spokesperson said, “The BSF strongly objected to dastardly sniper attacks on two BSF men on January 3 and January 17. The unprovoked firing and shelling, targeting a number of villages, innocent civilian and properties, was also raised. The BSF registered a strong protest with a message that such provocative acts are unacceptable and will not be tolerated.”This was the first flag meeting between the BSF and Rangers this year. Last time, both the forces had met on September 29, 2017, over the issue of maintaining the sanctity of the ceasefire.The BSF delegation, comprising five officers, was led by DIG, BSF, Jammu sector, PS Dhiman. The Pakistani team of 10 officers was led by Sector Commander, Chenab Rangers, Sialkot, Brigadier Amjad Hussain. Several wing commanders were also part of the Pakistani delegation.“The meeting is the first sector commander-level meeting between the two border forces since heavy shelling and firing erupted along the International Border last week to which the BSF gave a calibrated reply. During the firing and shelling, the BSF successfully foiled a number of infiltration attempts from Pakistani soil while killing one intruder on January 4 in the Arnia sector,” the BSF spokesperson added.The recent skirmishes along the border started on the January 17-18 intervening night and lasted up to January 22. Two BSF soldiers and seven civilians died in Pakistani firing. During this period, four soldiers also died in Pakistani firing and shelling along the Line of Control.Since January 22 morning, the International Border has been witnessing calm. Today’s flag meeting is expected to ensure peace on the border


Give special training, fixed tenure to IAS officers: Ex-CAG Vinod Rai

Give special training, fixed tenure to IAS officers: Ex-CAG Vinod Rai
Former CAG Vinod Rai. File photo

Singapore, January 17

Former Comptroller and Auditor General of India (CAG) Vinod Rai has suggested that the IAS officers should be given training in specialised areas, like infrastructure and education, have a fixed tenure of three years and not be replaced frequently to allow them to deliver in the country’s progress.

He also said that the Indian civil service still attracts the “very best” of the people as it provides them “substantial” opportunities that have opened up within the country.

“I make a strong recommendation that there is a strong need to train civil servants in specialised areas, which are among other sectors of the economy which require specialised civil servants,” Rai said while responding to a question after delivering a lecture on “The Indian Civil Service: Has it Delivered?” at the Singapore’s Institute of South Asian Studies on Tuesday.

Rai is a distinguished visiting research fellow of the Institute and a former IAS officer who served as the 11th CAG of India, between January 2008 and May 2013.

He was appointed as the interim president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) by the Supreme Court of India in January last year.

“Specialise the civil servants, give them a tenure of at least three years and stop their frequent replacements.

“Frequent replacements of civil servants, as it has been happening, affect their performance as they do not have enough time to settle into a job,” Rai said.

Replying to another question, the former CAG said that what the civil service is expected to deliver today is far more complex than it was earlier. “Sixty years ago was very fundamental.”

The former CAG also said the Indian civil service is definitely attracting talent which is, if not the best, is the very best or near the very best today.

This is because the opportunities that have opened up within the country are “very substantial”, he pointed.

Noting that the 2016 batch of civil servants had 11 people from the prestigious Indian Institute of Management (IIM), he said, “They must have been the best for getting into IIM. It (civil service) still attract the best”.

Rai also said that if given an opportunity, he would join the civil service, as it gives fulfilment in serving and not the compensation or distraction of political interference in bureaucracy. PTI


India is in a now-or-never situation BY RN Malik

The most threatening crisis facing India is that of population explosion. But how many MPs have raised this issue in Parliament? We also lag in areas of poverty, sanitation, infrastructure development and economic reforms.

India is in a now-or-never situation

RN Malik

Retired engineer-in-chief, Public Health Department, HaryanaOn this Republic Day, roughly 260 million people are living below the poverty line under very dehumanising conditions. An equal number, called marginally poor, live just above that line. Their progeny is born sick and suffer from nutritional problems throughout their lives. The life of people falling in the lower middle income group is also not free from miseries and struggles. Now rich are getting richer and the poor poorer. Insanitation and corruption have become omnipresent. The purpose of demonetisation stands defeated because anybody can draw any amount from the bank to use it for bribery. In fact, it was done to remove the tag of ‘Soot-boot Ki Sarkar’. Business in Sadar-Bazars is still being conducted in ‘Number-2′. Healthcare is on the verge of collapse. Major cities have become virtual gas chambers. Indices for Human Development Index and Ease of Doing Business are very low (134 and 90, respectively). Farmers are committing suicides. Progress in hydro power and water resources development (the backbone of agriculture) is notional. Infrastructure development is tardy. The amount of non-recoverable loans has gone up to Rs 10 lakh crore. The amount of stressed loans may be even more. The quality of engineering and medical education has touched a new low. All states are debt-ridden. The FDRI Bill will create trust deficit among depositors. The GDP growth of 7 to 8 per cent is putative and jobless. When asked to bend, the media chooses to crawl, with few exceptions. The poll bonds scheme is glossed with opacity. POSCO is sitting idle in Orissa for 13 years to set up a big iron plant. Air India and power utilities are under heavy debts. Insanitation and financial crunch mar the Railways. Damage to the reputation of judiciary is now beyond redemption after the press conference of the four Supreme Court judges. These are all clear signs of a failed nation.Look at the developed nations. They were ravaged during the World War II. Poland was annihilated. Japan was bombed and burnt. But these countries were able to stand on their own feet within 15 years. China was raped and ravaged by Japanese forces for 10 years. Then the Cultural Revolution of Mao killed 70 million people in 1950. Its economy was in a shambles till 1978 and GDP growth in 1961 was -27.2%. Then the doughty Deng Xiaoping came and transformed China into the third largest economy in the world.On the other hand, people in under-developed countries are struggling with abject poverty because they are reeling under a corrupt and rotten political system. Rot in India’s body politic started in 1966 after the death of LB Shastri. The usurping and corrupt political class gradually polluted the bureaucracy and destroyed meritocracy. The political class is flushed with time-servers, sycophants and power-hungry people. As many as 33 per cent legislators are tinged with criminal records. It is operating like some kind of a mafia and is busy practising divisive, disruptive, dynastic and vote bank politics to rule and befool the people. The main avocation of ruling parties has been to throw crumbs to the poor in the form of freebies. High hopes were raised when Narendra Modi came on the national scene in 2014. Now his 42-month rule has belied all such hopes. Rhetorics like Skill India or New India do not enchant people anymore. The PM has become more pompous than a pragmatic doer. The Gujarat model was deflated recently when it was revealed that farmers’ community was in dire straits. Only projects of national highways, coal mining, freight corridors, metro and providing sanitary toilets to make India open defecation-free are making good progress. But this is not enough, considering the demands of the time. A strong impression is building up that the BJP rules India and the RSS rules the BJP. Buses and buildings are being given a saffron coat.  The job of a visionary prime minister is to draw a precise roadmap to ensure eradication of poverty and remove the ‘under-developed’ tag in the least possible time. No PM has followed this cardinal principle  after Nehru. Instead of raising the slogan of “Garibi Mukt Bharat “, Modi raised “Congress Mukt Bharat” which speaks of an attitude of the worst kind of demagoguery. According to Jeffrey Sachh, the four keys to open the doors of prosperity for a nation are strict population control, sanitation, infrastructure development and administrative and economic reforms. China did that and transformed itself into an economic powerhouse. It completed its 18,200-MW Three Gorges Dam in just six years. (Total installed capacity of NHPC since 1982 is 6,500 MW). The most threatening crisis facing India is of population explosion. Now it is 132 crore. We are adding one Australia every year and, at this rate, it will be 150 crore in 2027 and thoroughly unmanageable. But, how many MPs have raised the issue of the looming demographic disaster in Parliament or waging war against poverty? The PM has never called a meeting of the CMs to discuss the strategy of economic development.  The CMs are treating the states as their fiefs. The Parliament has become an exhibition of mudslinging matches among different parties, bedlam and adjournments. The MPs and MLAs behave like brothers only when it comes to enhancing their own emoluments.Communal flare-ups like the one in Pune and violent reservation movements are only a trailer of the anarchy waiting to happen. The country is in a now-or-never situation. This is the only time to take up radical  measures. But unfortunately, there is a famine of visionary leaders like Sardar Patel or Xiaoping or Lee Kuan Yiew who can steer the country out of the mess.