Sanjha Morcha

Major pens books on battle with rep tape to claim rights

While soldiers give their lives saving the nation at Line of Control, their families are left to fight another battle with the bureaucracy. Sharing the real life accounts of the defence personnel, disabled soldiers and their kin who have been wronged by the system, Major Navdeep Singh has authored a book ‘Maimed by the System’.

ANIL DAYAL/HT(From left) Lt Gen KJ Singh (retd), author Navdeep Singh and General VP Malik (retd) during a book launch at Panjab University in Chandigarh on Sunday.


The biggest problem we all face is the confrontation between civilians and military personnel at the Ministry of Defence
VP MALIK, General

Gen VP Malik (retd) released the second edition of the book in Panjab University on Sunday.

The author has penned down the real stories of the individuals who had to fight difficult battles with the officialdom to claim their basic rights post disability and post battle.

There are over 20 such stories in the latest edition.

“Each story has made us (senior officers) feel how stupid we were when people were entitled to something and we were not able to get them the same,” said Gen VP Malik (Retired).

Gen Malik said, “I would suggest everyone to read the book. The things have not improved even today when nearly 90% litigation is on the account of disability pension.”

He further said “The biggest problem we all face is the confrontation between civilians and military personnel at the Ministry of Defence.”

“We have not been able to resolve the system, which is dependent more on people who have never been part of the service,” he said.

Major Navdeep Singh said, “I don’t want to write such a book again since this should not happen to our people again.”

“We will not able to change the system unless there is a body to keep check,” he added.


Annual Civil Military Liaison Conference between Headquarters Western Command and Government of Punjab

#AnnualCivilMilitaryLiaison Conference between Headquarters Western Command and Government of Punjab was held #HQWesternCommand. The meeting was co-chaired by Honorable Chief Minister of Punjab and #GeneralOfficerCommanding, Western Command which was attended by Senior Military Officers from HQ Western Command and Civilian Officers of the State Government. The cordial discussions would enhance the coordination and synergy between the Military and Civil departments. The positive response from the Honorable CM and State Government made the meeting very successful.

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Pvt firms can directly propose to make military weapons now

Tribune News Service

New Delhi, January 17The private industry that can make a product, equipment or weapon to be used by armed forces can now just send in proposal suo-moto and not wait to be invited to send in a proposal.Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman has changed the norms that enable greater participation of the industry in acquisition of defence equipment. This process will greatly help in substituting imported equipment and promote innovative solutions.This will amend the ‘Make Procedure’ in Defence Procurement Procedure (DPP)-2016 and allow direct proposals from builders instead of the existing systems of the MoD sending out a Request for Information (RFI) that generally goes to integrator or the big established players.The industry, start-ups or individuals can suggest their projects, as per a list put out by the armed forces, especially among those items which are currently being imported. The industry or start-up sending the proposal can also have foreign tie-up to the tune of 49 per cent foreign holding, however, but at least 40 per cent of the content has to be Indian made.The suggesting industry will continue to have full intellectual property rights (IPR), the government can take controlling rights only in rare and specified circumstances involving national security.There will be no limit to the number of industries who may respond to the Expression of Interest for development of the prototype subject to meeting the minimum qualification criteria. The design and development time of 12 to 30 weeks will be granted to industry to offer the prototypes. There is no limit to the number of industry players who may show interest and offer prototype.After this selection, a commercial request for proposal will be issued. The industry which wins the bid is assured of an order.


Seminar on issues pertaining to medicine procurement under the Ex-Servicemen Contributory Health Scheme::WESTERN COMMAND

Seminar on issues pertaining to medicine procurement under the Ex-Servicemen Contributory Health Scheme #ECHS was held at Command Hospital #WesternCommand. The seminar was attended by Lt Gen Surinder Singh #ArmyCommander #WesternComd, Veterans & other military dignitaries.

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CHINA STEPS INTO THE VACUUM LEFT BY THE US

CHINA’S WILLINGNESS TO INVEST WITHOUT POLITICAL PRECONDITION IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES IN EVERY REGION MAKES IT AN ATTRACTIVE ALTERNATIVE TO THE US

In October 2017, Xi Jinping delivered the most consequential speech since Mikhail Gorbachev announced the dissolution of the Soviet Union. Addressing the Communist Party’s 19th Party Congress, Xi made clear that China is ready to claim its share of global leadership.

As he begins his second five-year term, Xi has consolidated enough power at home to redefine China’s external environment and set new rules within it. His timing is perfect; China is stepping forward just at the moment that a politically embattled and distracted US president is scaling back US commitment to traditional allies and alliances. The United States has created a vacuum, and China stands ready to fill it.

For decades, western leaders have assumed that a new Chinese middle class would force China’s leaders to liberalise the country’s politics. Instead, it is western democracy that now appears under siege as citizens, angry over the toll that globalisation has taken on their lives and livelihoods, demand change and governments fail to deliver. Democracy itself is threatened by a weakening of public confidence in traditional political parties, the reliability of public information, and the inviolability of voting.

By contrast, China’s leaders have delivered steady advances in the country’s prosperity and a rising sense of China’s importance for the world. Old problems like repression, censorship, corruption, and pollution remain, but measurable progress in many areas of life give China’s people a confidence in their leaders that many Americans and Europeans no longer have.

What does this mean for the world? For trade and investment, China is the only country with a global strategy. With its vast Belt-Road project and its willingness to invest – without political precondition – in developing countries in every region, China is scaling up its ambitions even as Europe focuses on European problems and trade becomes a dirty word in US politics. Governments across Asia, Latin America, Africa, and the Middle East are now more likely to align with, and imitate, China’s explicitly transactional approach to foreign policy.

Then there is the global battle for technological dominance. In particular, the US and China now lead the charge on investment in artificial intelligence. For the US, this leadership comes from the private sector. In China, it comes from the state, which directs the country’s powerful companies in ways that serve state interests.

China’s appeal is not ideological. The only political value Beijing exports is the principle of non-interference in other countries’ affairs. Yet, that’s attractive for governments that are used to western demands for political and economic reform in exchange for financial help. With the advent of Trump’s “America first” foreign policy and the many distractions for Europe’s leaders, there is no counter to China’s non-values-driven approach to commerce and diplomacy.

There are obvious limits to China’s international appeal. It will be decades before China can exert the sort of global military power that the US can. China remains a regional power, and the military spending gap continues to widen in the US’ favour. Nor are China’s neighbours comfortable with Beijing’s ability to project force near their borders. But conventional military power is less important for international influence today than it has ever been, given the threats to national security posed in a globalised world by the potential weaponisation of economic influence and the unclear balance of power in cyberspace.

We should also expect Japan, India, Australia, and South Korea to work together more often to limit China’s regional power, creating risks of friction and even conflict. Depending on the state of US-China relations, the Trump administration might become more active in the region, as well.

For Americans and Europeans, China’s system holds little appeal. For most everyone else, the China model offers a plausible alternative. With Xi ready and willing to offer that alternative, this is the world’s biggest geopolitical risk in 2018. Ian Bremmer is the president of Eurasia Group and author of Superpower: Three Choices for America’s Role in the World The views expressed are personal


Sangrur sepoy among 4 killed in Pak firing

BORDER FLARE­UP RS Pura, Akhnoor, KG sectors targeted; toll mounts to 10 since Wednesday; schools near IB, LoC shut for 3 days

JAMMU: Four people, including three civilians and an army soldier, were killed and over a dozen others injured on the International Border and the Line of Control (LoC) in relentless ceasefire violations by Pakistan in Jammu region on Wednesday.

HT PHOTOAn unexploded shell fired by Pakistan Rangers lies in a village in RS Pura sector of Jammu district.

Eleven others, including two Border Security Force (BSF) men, were also injured.

Saturday’s casualties have taken the death toll to 10 since Wednesday.

“Pakistan Rangers targeted over 30 Indian posts and border villages from RS Pura sector to Akhnoor sector north of Jammu since 5.40 am,” said a BSF spokesperson. Within a few hours, they opened up another front along the LoC in Poonch.

Northern Command spokesman Colonel NN Joshi said, “Pakistan Army initiated unprovoked and indiscriminate firing of small arms and automatics at 8.20 am in KG sector. Our troops retaliated effectively. However, Sepoy Mandeep Singh, 23, belonging to Punjab, was grievously injured. The armyman later succumbed to his injuries,”

Sepoy Mandeep Singh belonged to Alampur village in Sangrur district and is survived by his father Gurnam Singh.

The firing also killed 17-yearold Ghara Singh, son of Ashok Kumar of Kapoorpur village, and 45-year-old Ghar Singh of Bera village in RS Pura sector of Jammu district.

As the shelling continued, another civilian Tarsem Kumar, 32, son of Bansi Lal of Gajansoo village in Kanachak sector of Jammu district was killed later in the day.

“Tarsem was brought dead at the Government Medical College and Hospital in Jammu. He was hit by Pak shelling and probably died enroute,” said a cop posted at the GMC police post.

A police officer said fresh skirmishes in RS Pura sector also left nine civilians injured.

Will join army to avenge his death, vows sepoy’s brother

I am proud of my brother who has sacrificed his life. I will join the army. JAGDEEP SINGH, brother

SANGRUR: Brother of sepoy Mandeep Singh, 23, killed in unprovoked ceasefire violation by Pakistan in the Krishna Ghati sector in Jammu and Kashmir on Saturday, vowed to join the Indian Army to avenge the killing.

Sepoy Mandeep Singh’s father Gurnam Singh.

As father Gurnam Singh sat unmoving in a corner, too shocked to speak, the sepoy’s younger brother, Jagdeep Singh, 20, said, “I am proud of my brother who has sacrificed his life for the country. I will also join the army to kill the country’s enemies,” Jagdeep said.

He added that he had spoken to his brother over phone two days ago.

Residents of Mandeep’s native village of Alampur in Moonak sub-division, around 70km from Sangrur, are also in shock.

Mandeep, who had last visited home in February, was supposed to visit again to make arrangements for the wedding of his sister next month.

He had joined the 22 Sikh regiment around three years ago. His uncle Nirmal Singh is also an ex-serviceman.

“My nephew was a brave soldier. He wanted to buy a motorcycle when he visited home next to make arrangements for his sister’s wedding,” said Nirmal.

“Mandeep’s body will reach the village either on Sunday evening or Monday morning,” said Jasvir Singh, Lehra station house officer.

Later in the day, naib tehsildar Hamir Singh and some police officers visited Mandeep’s house to offer condolences.


Should ex-Prez, PM get govt houses, asks SC

Tribune News Service

New Delhi, January 17Should former Presidents, Prime Ministers, Governors and Chief Ministers be given government bungalows for accommodation?The Supreme Court on Wednesday sought to know the views of the Centre and states on the suggestions made by senior advocate Gopal Subramanium, who is assisting the court as amicus curiae in a case against such a law in Uttar Pradesh.In his submission before the top court, Subramanium had on January 4 suggested that the UP law was arbitrary and liable to be struck down. Ministers who demitted office did not require public property. “A large number of bungalows have also been given to trusts,” he had submitted.Subramanium had said if the court wanted to expand the scope of the PIL, then it will have to hear the states and the Centre.However, instead of issuing formal notice to the government, a Bench headed by Justice Ranjan Gogoi on Wednesday asked Subramanium to give copies of his suggestions to Attorney General KK Venugopal and Advocates General of states, having laws similar to the one in Uttar Pradesh, which is under challenge. It posted the matter for further hearing on March 13.The Bench is seized of a PIL filed by Lok Prahari, an NGO, challenging the 2016 amendments to the Uttar Pradesh Ministers (Salaries, Allowances and Miscellaneous) Provisions Act, 1981, during the then Akhilesh Singh Yadav government.The amendment was introduced following the top court’s August 1, 2016, verdict ordering eviction of official bungalows allotted to six former chief ministers of the state in two months after it concluded that the 1997 rules on allotment brought in by the state government were in contravention of the existing UP Ministers (Salaries, Allowances and Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1981.The UP Government had earlier defended it saying the facility given to former CMs was in line with similar facility given to former Presidents, PMs and Vice Presidents.


Can truce along LoC be restored? by Lt-Gen Syed Ata Hasnain (retd)

A good beginning may be made by agreeing to establish a line of communication between important sectors and formations on the LoC to allow interaction between field commanders.

Can truce along LoC be restored?

Lt-Gen Syed Ata Hasnain (retd)THE nearest to an official and written ceasefire agreement at the LoC is only enshrined in the subtext of the Simla Agreement of July 2, 1972. However, since then, LoC soldiering has assumed a different colour. It’s not just about preserving the ‘sanctity of the LoC’ with Pakistan, an adage well known to Indian Army officers; it’s much to do with proving a couple of points.  First, which is the more macho Army and, by extension, the more macho nation? Second, which is the more professional army? Yet, more importantly, it’s all about ‘moral ascendancy’. I can’t remember a definition of the term in any Indian Army publication; perhaps the Pakistanis may be having something of their own. Nevertheless, since it is a task spelt out to every LoC commander, it does deserve an analysis of its interpretation and what affect that has on the attitude towards and manifestation of ceasefire.On the face of it, moral ascendancy is all about being professionally more competent than your adversary. However, the most important aspect is motivation and morale. There are increasing instances in which units of the two armies, which faced each other in Siachen or later days of Kargil 1999, are coming back face to face once again at the LoC. The antipathy then was much higher. All this is fine. It’s when the lead begins to fly around that problems arise. Even worse, when rogue actions from across the LoC  involve bestial acts such as beheading, they have to be responded to. Otherwise, the moral ascendancy slips and that’s not acceptable by a mile or more.It’s not as if ceasefire infringements commenced only in 1989, the year when Pakistan decided to launch its proxy war to exploit the fast-track changes the world was then undergoing. The moral ascendancy game was in play through the late seventies and eighties, but with one difference: there was no infiltration of terrorists. Immediately after 1989, the LoC got associated primarily with infiltration; terror sponsors in Pakistan found that the simplest way of forcing gaps in deployment to effect infiltration was to push Indian ambushes, deployed in the open, into their posts which had overhead protection (OHP) from fire. Even with the construction of the LoC fence, although partial OHP exists at ambush sites, it is the resultant chaos from shelling and small arms fire that assists in infiltration.On November 26, 2003, Pakistan took a decision to vigorously implement the ceasefire and abide by it. Although it appeared unilateral and India has never made it look any different, the truth is that some behind-the-scene parleys did assist in reaching that stage where Pakistan could announce its ‘offer’. There was no official document signed by the two sides, although recorded announcements to abide by it made it appear as a de facto agreement. Infiltration attempts continued as before, but at reduced levels. Why President Musharraf accepted, or as claimed, even initiated the ‘proper implementation’ of the 1972 ceasefire remains a mystery to the day. Analysis of initiatives which characterised the Vajpayee premiership is a subject by itself, but there was a Vajpayee-Musharraf moment which captured the essence of what could have been the grounding for an improved Indo-Pak relationship. The ceasefire was probably the result of that. Many a Pakistani strategic analyst I have spoken with has failed to identify the Musharraf thought process. And Pervez Musharraf today is in search of another identity; he would preferably disassociate himself with the ceasefire.The LoC remained quiet almost till 2009 when one segment in the Krishna Ghati sector erupted and has never quieted thereafter. Siachen has remained a model of the ceasefire as much as has been Kargil. This gives weight to the argument that breaches of ceasefire take place in infiltration-prone areas because there is no infiltration in the Ladakh zone. Paradoxically, larger attempts at infiltration have been made in the Machil, Keran, Tangdhar and Lipa sectors of the Valley, but very few breaches of ceasefire have occurred there. In recent years, the major LoC exchanges have all been south of the Pir Panjal and along the International Border (IB), the latter being held by the BSF. The area has little terrorist presence, but some sleeper agents continue to exist. However, the area is more vulnerable to transient terror through infiltration of suicide squads (fidayeen) due to the shorter distances and potential of single-night operations. Currently, the prime reasons for the breach of ceasefire by the Pakistani side revolve around a few factors. Firstly, infiltration continues to play a role, irrespective of the explanations above. 2 Secondly, the LoC offers the easiest location for the demonstration of violence for the international community to take note that the J&K conflict continues to fester; it is Pakistan’s abiding interest to prove this despite being a signatory to the bilateral clause of the Simla Agreement. Earlier, major terror attacks sponsored by Pakistan preceded big ticket events such as high-profile international visits to South Asia or even the annual UN General Assembly session. With better Indian control over J&K, it isn’t easy to do that; the LoC becomes the next best symbol for demonstration. Thirdly, the Hindu populated areas of the Jammu IB or LoC belt get targeted to cause more angst within J&K and, indeed, within India and enhance the communal temperature to Pakistani advantage. Fourthly, Pakistani friendly jihadi elements such as the Jaish-e-Mohammad (JeM) and Lashkar-e-Taiyaba (LeT) maintain their relevance through shallow infiltration and attempted terrorist actions against objectives closer to the LoC, as shown by the Uri and Mohra attacks in the Jhelum Valley. Lastly, with increasing political ambitions of the jihadi groups of Hafiz Sayeed and Masood Azhar, spectacular acts at the LoC or deeper in the hinterland will continue so as to draw attention and attraction.In the light of the history of the ceasefire, the fact that it hardly exists today and the harder response by India without remorse, the feasibility of returning to 2003 remains remote. It could have happened with PM Modi’s initiative of December 25, 2015, or may still find life in a sudden unprovoked peace-related trigger. The advantage of keeping the LoC hot finds favour with Pakistan, but once a threshold is crossed, India will not disfavour a more robust response. Pakistan’s intent is to somehow bring the UN military observers into the scene so as to internationalise the issue and rescind the provisions of the Simla Agreement. The initiative for the ceasefire cannot come from India because the triggers come from Pakistan. It is up to Gen Qamar Bajwa to find his own moment if peace is to return to the LoC; the chances of that in 2018 appear more remote than ever. A good beginning may be made by agreeing to establish a line of communication between important sectors and formations on the LoC to allow interaction between field commanders.


LIST OF AWARDEE ON REPUBLIC DAY 2018

PARAM VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-35479Y LT GEN BALWANT SINGH NEGI, UYSM, YSM, SM, VSM**, INF
2. IC-35796A LT GEN KANWAL JEET SINGH GILL, AVSM, VSM, EME (RETD)
3. IC-35904Y LT GEN SARATH CHAND, UYSM, AVSM, VSM, INF
4. IC-35919F LT GEN AMARJEET SINGH, AVSM**, SM, INF
5. IC-35923K LT GEN JAGBIR SINGH CHEEMA, AVSM, VSM, INF (RETD)
6. IC-35960X LT GEN SHRAVAN KUMAR PATYAL, UYSM, SM, INF
7. IC-35965W LT GEN RAJENDRA RAMRAO NIMBHORKAR, UYSM, AVSM, SM**, VSM, INF
8. IC-35987P LT GEN DEWAN RABINDRANATH SONI, VSM, ARMD
9. IC-38311X LT GEN SATISH KUMAR DUA, UYSM, SM, VSM, INF
10. IC-38654N LT GEN DEVRAJ ANBU, UYSM, AVSM, YSM, SM, INF
11. IC-38679A LT GEN ABHAY KRISHNA, UYSM, AVSM, SM, VSM, INF
12. IC-38722W LT GEN CHERISH MATHSON, SM, VSM, INF
13. IC-39083M LT GEN SANJAY KUMAR JHA, AVSM, YSM, SM, INF
14. IC-39098P LT GEN GURPRATAP SINGH DHILLON, AVSM, YSM, SM, INF
15. IC-39295X LT GEN PARMINDER JIT SINGH PANNU, AVSM, VSM, INF
16. IC-39818L LT GEN SURESH SHARMA, AVSM, ENGRS
17. MR-03992M LT GEN ARUP KUMAR DAS, AMC
18. IC-38691F MAJ GEN JATINDER SINGH BEDI, ARTY (RETD)
19. IC-40700W MAJ GEN SANJAY THAPA, ARTY

KIRTI CHAKRA

1. IC-66219P MAJ VIJAYANT BIST, JAK LI

UTTAM YUDH SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-38753W LT GEN JASWINDER SINGH SANDHU, AVSM, VSM, INF
2. IC-39185H LT GEN AJAE KUMAR SHARMA, YSM, SM, INF
3. IC-39465W LT GEN AMARJEET SINGH BEDI, YSM, VSM, INF
4. IC-39492A LT GEN ANIL CHAUHAN, AVSM, SM, VSM, INF

BAR TO ATI VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-35962H LT GEN LALIT KUMAR PANDEY, AVSM, SM, INF (RETD)
2. IC-39070P LT GEN RANBIR SINGH, AVSM, YSM, SM, INF

ATI VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-35201X LT GEN AJAI KUMAR SAHGAL, VSM, AAD (RETD)
2. IC-35955M LT GEN AMRIK SINGH, SM, INF
3. IC-37398X LT GEN RAJAN RAVINDRAN, VSM, INF
4. IC-39073H LT GEN SANJEEV KUMAR SHRIVASTAVA, ENGRS
5. IC-39130Y LT GEN RAJEEV CHOPRA, INF
6. IC-39140H LT GEN PARMINDER SINGH JAGGI, AAD
7. IC-39283H LT GEN KANWAL KUMAR, ARMY AVN
8. IC-39380A LT GEN PODALI SHANKAR RAJESHWAR, VSM, ARTY
9. IC-39436F LT GEN SATINDER KUMAR SAINI, YSM, VSM, INF
10. IC-39624H LT GEN PRADEEP M BALI, VSM, INF
11. IC-39675W LT GEN VIJAY SINGH, SM, VSM, INF
12. IC-39871W LT GEN SANTOSH KUMAR UPADHYA, SM, VSM, INF
13. IC-39898N LT GEN DEPINDER SINGH AHUJA, ENGRS
14. IC-40031H LT GEN SANJEEV KANAL, ARTY
15. IC-40101W LT GEN RAJNI KANT JAGGA, VSM, ARMD
16. IC-40235P LT GEN GOPAL R, SM, INF
17. IC-40753P LT GEN MANMOHAN JEET SINGH KAHLON, ARMD
18. V-000359F LT GEN AMOLOK JIT SINGH, VSM, RVC
19. MR-04142P LT GEN SANJEEV CHOPRA, VSM, AMC
20. IC-40795F MAJ GEN SANJEEV NARAIN, INF
21. IC-40873N MAJ GEN RAMACHANDRA NAGRAJ, VSM, SIGS
22. IC-41072Y MAJ GEN RAJEEV SIROHI, VSM, INF
23. IC-41166W MAJ GEN SATINDER SINGH, AAD
24. IC-41183W MAJ GEN SURESH CHANDRA MOHANTY, GUARDS
25. IC-41860H MAJ GEN SHANTANU DAYAL, SM, VSM, INF
26. IC-42004X MAJ GEN RANA PRATAP KALITA, SM, VSM, INF
27. IC-42389A MAJ GEN BAGGAVALLI SOMASHEKAR RAJU, YSM, INF
28. IC-45050X MAJ GEN TEJBIR SINGH, SM, INF
29. MR-05596P MAJ GEN MADHURI KANITKAR, VSM, AMC
30. IC-49650X BRIG GAMBHIR SINGH, GARH RIF

SHAURYA CHAKRA

1. IC-76619P MAJ AKHIL RAJ RV, GRENADIERS
2. IC-76020F CAPT ROHIT SHUKLA, RAJPUT 
3. SS-44764Y CAPT ABHINAV SHUKLA, PARA (SF) 
4. TA-42759Y CAPT PRADEEP SHOURY ARYA, INF BN (TA) PARA ATT WITH PARA (SF) 
5. 2691007Y HAV MUBARIK ALI, GRENADIERS 
6. 5047762N HAV RABINDRA THAPA, GR 
7. 13625628L NK NARENDER SINGH, PARA (SF) 
8. 9109592Y L/NK BADHER HUSSAIN, Inf 
9. 13630400Y PTR MANCHU, PARA (SF)

YUDH SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-42336F MAJ GEN AJAI KUMAR SINGH, SM, VSM, INF
2. IC-48579H BRIG CHARANJEET SINGH DEWGUN, GR
3. IC-48681L BRIG RAGHAVACHARI SANTHANA RAMAN, Inf
4. IC-49189M BRIG NAGENDRA SINGH, SM, Inf
5. IC-49500F BRIG ABHIJIT SURENDRA PENDHARKAR, ASSAM
6. IC-49588W BRIG MOHINDER PAL SINGH, SM, JAK RIF
7. IC-50080Y BRIG YASHPAL SINGH AHLAWAT, SM, MADRAS
8. IC-56428Y COL MOHINDER KUMAR SHAN, JAK LI
9. IC-60233L COL SHARANG PUN, GR
10. IC-60253Y COL KAMAL NAURIYAL, GRENADIERS


SENA MEDAL (GALLANTRY)

1. IC-56328N COL CHARANPREET SINGH, JAK RIF
2. IC-63279Y LT COL PRAVEEN MADHAV KHANZODE, INT 
3. IC-65402L LT COL ASHUTOSH SHARMA, GUARDS
4. IC-64017P MAJ TEJAS B CANDADE, PARA (SF)
5. IC-66253P MAJ RAJAT VYAS, SIKH LI
6. IC-67758X MAJ SAMEER BANSAL, PARA (SF)
7. IC-68144F MAJ NISHIT KASHYAP, PUNJAB
8. IC-70493K MAJ SANDEEP THAPA, ARTY
9. IC-71397F MAJ AKSHAY CHAUBEY, ASC 
10. IC-71931N MAJ SUKHWINDER SINGH, ASC
11. IC-72229P MAJ KARTIKEYA MANRAL, KUMAON
12. IC-72351L MAJ KULDEEP SINGH, RAJ RIF
13. IC-72759K MAJ SACHIN SINGH RAWAT, ASSAM
14. IC-73342W MAJ VIPUL NARAYAN, GRENADIERS 
15. IC-75017P MAJ SIDDHARTH KUMAR NAYAK, ARTY
16. IC-75423P MAJ NITESH KUMAR,PARA (SF)
17. IC-75775M MAJ K NAVEEN REDDY, ENGRS
18. IC-76440F MAJ TASOU PRAO, JAK RIF
19. IC-79137L MAJ NINGTHOUJAM MAKJAL SINGH GR
20. SS-43376P MAJ VARUN SINGH SLATHIA, SIKH LI 
21. SS-43634K MAJ VIKRAM SINGH, ASC
22. IC-75931L CAPT ABHISHEK KUMAR, MECH INF
23. IC-76434N CAPT NAVEEN SIGER, PARA (SF)
24. IC-76546N CAPT DAVINDER PAL SINGH, MAHAR
25. IC-77276W CAPT SAHIL BHARDWAJ, SIKH LI
26. IC-77396P CAPT DUSHYANT SINGH, ARMD
27. IC-77896M CAPT MANISH KUMAR SINGH, PARA (SF)
28. IC-78776A CAPT DIVYANSHU AHUJA, ENGRS
29. IC-80335H CAPT DUOMAI SHOZII PAOSHO, MADRAS 
30. SS-44861W CAPT KAUSTUBH PRAKASHKUMAR RANE, GARH RIF
31. SS-47582W CAPT PRANAY PANWAR, SIKH 
32. SS-47917H CAPT PRANSHU MAURYA, GR
33. SS-48221K CAPT PRABHAKAR DEV SINGH, DOGRA 
34. JC-431089M SUB SHASHI KUMAR, PUNJAB (POSTHUMOUS)
35. JC-460076X SUB RAMESH KUMAR, MARATHA LI
36. JC-471297K SUB JAIVIR SINGH, RAJ RIF
37. JC-612987A SUB MANISH GURUNG, GR
38. JC-413919P NB SUB ASHOK KUMAR, PARA (SF)
39. JC-414162K NB SUB SUNIL KUMAR, PARA (SF)
40. 2493054L HAV BALWANT SINGH, PARA (SF)
41. 2494144Y HAV VIJAY KUMAR, PARA (SF)
42. 2791742K HAV KARAMBHALKAR RAJARAM TUKARAM, MARATHA LI
43. 4079429M HAV AVTAR SINGH, GARH RIF
44. 4272189F HAV PRABHU SAHAY TIRKEY, BIHAR (POSTHUMOUS)
45. 4275229H HAV SHEW SHANKAR CHAUDHARI, BIHAR
46. 4366524Y HAV RONGSEN SASHI, PARA (SF)
47. 4569674K HAV VINOD KUMAR, MAHAR
48. 13622774A HAV LAXMAN SINGH, PARA (SF)
49. 13757526X HAV JALIL AHMED, JAK LI
50. 15561142H HAV BHAG SINGH, ENGRS
51. 2802845L NK JADHAV SANDIP SARJERAO, MARATHA LI (POSTHUMOUS)
52. 2895878A NK VIKASH KUMAR, RAJ RIF
53. 3002654L NK BALATTAR SINGH, RAJPUT
54. 4482042H NK JALOUR SINGH, SIKH LI
55. 5049253N NK BADRI BAHADUR GURUNG, GR 
56. 9423262K NK DEEPAK KUMAR, GR
57. 13625783M NK TILAK RAJ, PARA (SF)
58. 13764688L NK GAGANDEEP SINGH, JAK LI
59. 13767229X NK PURSHOTAM KUMAR, PARA (SF)
60. 13769548H NK VIRENDER SINGH, PARA (SF)
61. 15140481F NK BALAUR SINGH, ARTY
62. 2698814W L/NK NARESH KUMAR, GREN 
63. 2698879K L/NK BABU LAL, GREN
64. 13626753F L/NK RAJPATI SHAHNI, PARA (SF)
65. 14934920W L/NK AJAY SINGH PARIHAR, MECH INF
66. 15621397P L/NK VIPIN KUMAR, GUARDS
67. 2498961P SEP JASPAL SINGH, PUNJAB
68. 2502154A SEP SUKHRAJ SINGH, PUNJAB
69. 2813048A SEP KHARADE SANDIP KAILAS, MARATHA LI
70. 2813791P SEP MANE SAVAN BALKU, MARATHA LI (POSTHUMOUS)
71. 4376797P SEP NZAN LOTHA, ASSAM
72. 4377488Y SEP MILI KAMBU, ASSAM
73. 4379692W SEP RIKPE TAIPODIA, ASSAM
74. 4487592P SEP MANINDER SINGH, SIKH LI
75. 4491739X SEP JASPREET SINGH, SIKH LI (POSTHUMOUS)
76. 4584321F SEP GAWAI SUMEDH WAMAN, MAHAR (POSTHUMOUS)
77. 4585664K SEP ILAYARAJA P, MAHAR(POSTHUMOUS)
78. 9107784X SEP MOHD RAFIQ, JAK LI
79. 14705398M SEP THANGCHONLEN, ASSAM
80. 19002288P SEP AVTAR SINGH, SIKH 
81. 15233495N GNR BANWARI LAL, ARTY
82. 15234255H GNR SITA RAM, ARTY
83. 4088047K RFN YOGHESH SINGH, GARH RIF
84. 4094703W RFN SACHIN SINGH RANA, GARH RIF
85. 9112935P RFN JAWEED AHMAD SHEIKH, JAK LI 
86. 15503957Y SWR NARESH KUMAR SINGH, ARMD

SENA MEDAL (DISTINGUISHED)

1. IC-39106H MAJ GEN PANKAJ ARORA, ARTY (RETD)
2. IC-39457X MAJ GEN MOHANDEEP SINGH GHURA, VSM, INF
3. IC-39696M MAJ GEN JACOB THARAKAN CHACKO, AOC
4. IC-40804X MAJ GEN DIG VIJAY SETIA, VSM, ENGRS
5. IC-45022L MAJ GEN KANWAR MANMEET SINGH, ARTY
6. IC-42857P BRIG GURVIR SINGH KAHLON, PUNJAB, HQ IDS
7. IC-42919K BRIG MANOJ KUMAR, ARTY,
8. IC-43407K BRIG SURENDER PAVAMANI, ARTY, DDG EM(A)
9. IC-44057P BRIG RAJIV MANKOTIA, VSM, GR, DDG (PROC)
10. IC-45524N BRIG VISHWANATHAN VENKAT SUBRAMANIAM, MECH INF
11. IC-45577M BRIG GAUTAM GANGULY, VSM, GRENADIERS, HQ CTF
12. IC-47023M BRIG NAVNEET SINGH SARNA, ARTY, 
13. IC-48518L BRIG MOHIT MALHOTRA, ARMD
14. IC-48970A BRIG VIKRAM NAGPAL, GRENADIERS
15. IC-49151H BRIG RAJA CHAKRABORTY, BIHAR
16. IC-49472A BRIG SATISH DAHIYA, SIKH LI
17. IC-49480Y BRIG ROHIT CHOUDHARY, MARATHA LI
18. IC-49525N BRIG RAJESH SRIVASTAVA, ARTY, 
19. MR-05971P BRIG HARISHANKER AGRAWAL, VSM, AMC
20. IC-50785L COL ANIL JOHN ALFRED PEREIRA, SIGS 
21. IC-51018Y COL UMAID SINGH RATHORE, VSM, ARMY AVN
22. IC-53119L COL RAKESH NAIR, GR 
23. IC-53168N COL PRASHANT GANPATRAO SANKPAL, GARH RIF 
24. IC-54647F COL MELEVEETIL RAJIV MENON, MADRAS
25. IC-56330L COL VIKRAM JEET SINGH, KUMAON
26. IC-56441H COL IMON MUKHERJEE, MAHAR
27. IC-57836W COL BEERINDER SINGH SANDHU, MADRAS
28. IC-58679F COL SUVRAT CHATURVEDI, INT
29. IC-59088M COL VIJAY KUMAR SHARMA, GR
30. IC-59674P COL ASHOK PALIATH ACHUTHAN, SIKH LI
31. IC-60092F COL DHARMENDRA YADAV, SIKH LI
32. IC-64826P COL HARMANDEEP SINGH GREWAL, PUNJAB
33. IC-64859A COL VISHAL SINGH, JAK RIF
34. IC-56511W LT COL NAVEEN GAHLAWAT, INT 
35. IC-61399Y LT COL ANIL MEHTA, ARMY AVN
36. IC-62033N LT COL INDERJOT SINGH MANN, ARMD
37. IC-63479P LT COL RAJENDER SINGH JAMWAL, ARMY AVN
38. IC-70447P MAJ PRAVEEN KUMAR SINGH, ARMY AVN

BAR TO SENA MEDAL (DISTINGUISHED)

1. IC-45009F MAJ GEN SUKHDEEP SANGWAN, SM, INF
2. IC-58605M COL DHEERAJ KOTWAL, SM, SIKH LI

VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-37882K MAJ GEN DALIP SINGH, AOC
2. IC-39229P MAJ GEN DEVESH AGNIHOTRI, MECH INF
3. IC-39472M MAJ GEN JITENDRA KUMAR MARWAL, INF
4. IC-39812K MAJ GEN GIRISH KUMAR, ENGRS
5. IC-40757L MAJ GEN VIKAL SAHNI, SM, INF 
6. IC-41196N MAJ GEN SUDHAKAR JEE, INF
7. IC-41509F MAJ GEN KANWAL JEET SINGH DHILLON, YSM, INF
8. IC-41702N MAJ GEN ML MOHAN BABU, ARTY
9. IC-42079P MAJ GEN JITENDRA KUMAR SHUKLA, AAD
10. IC-43630N MAJ GEN SURESH MENON, SIGS
11. IC-45193X MAJ GEN ATUL KAUSHIK, SM, INF 
12. MR-04569Y MAJ GEN GAUTAM GANGULY, AMC
13. IC-40710A BRIG SURENDRA MEHTA, GR
14. IC-41927W BRIG SHIVENDER SINGH, YSM, GARH RIF
15. IC-42270W BRIG KAMAL KUMAR REPSWAL, SM, ENGRS
16. IC-42283N BRIG GURJEET SINGH KAMBO, ENGRS
17. IC-42782H BRIG DEEPAK OBHRAI, ARTY 
18. IC-42794X BRIG MV SUCHINDRA KUMAR, YSM, ASSAM
19. IC-43262K BRIG ARUN ANANTHANARAYAN, YSM, SM, GREN
20. IC-43395A BRIG MANOJ KUMAR BINDAL, AAD
21. IC-43843F BRIG ADISH YADAV, RAJ RIF
22. IC-43998W BRIG VIJAY RAMCHANDRA DESHMUKH, EME
23. IC-44055K BRIG VINOD MOHAN CHANDRAN, ARMD
24. IC-44082N BRIG ANEEL RAJ SINGH KAHLON, ARMD
25. IC-44474F BRIG RITU RAJ RAINA, SM, DOGRA
26. IC-45642F BRIG VENKATESHA REDDY G A, SC, JAT
27. IC-47002W BRIG JAGJIT SINGH MANGAT, ARMD
28. IC-47372W BRIG RAJ RISHI SHARMA, ARTY
29. IC-47657H BRIG MICHAEL AJ FERNANDEZ, ENGRS
30. IC-47994X BRIG J KAMESWARA RAO, ENGRS
31. IC-48044P BRIG SUKRITI SINGH DAHIYA, ENGRS 
32. IC-48539F BRIG ANIMISH SURESH RANADE, PARA
33. IC-48551H BRIG KISHAN PAL SINGH SIROHI, GUARDS
34. IC-48955N BRIG VIKRAM VARMA, ARMD
35. IC-49036H BRIG VIJAI SINGH RANA, MECH INF
36. IC-49048X BRIG RAKESH MANOCHA, SM, GRENADIERS
37. IC-49095P BRIG AMAR NATH KUKRETI, SM, GRENADIERS
38. IC-49496K BRIG PREET PAL SINGH, GR 
39. IC-49510L BRIG HITESH BHALLA, SC**, SM, MARATHA LI
40. IC-49794A BRIG KULDIP PATHAK, SM, MADRAS
41. MR-05069N BRIG SITARAM GHOSH, AMC
42. MR-05521X BRIG KAVITA SAHAI, AMC
43. IC-51475M COL AMIT TALWAR, ARMD
44. IC-52570L COL HARBINDER SINGH BRAR, SIKH
45. IC-52865F COL HEMENDRA BHANDARI, SIKH
46. IC-52892L COL KARAN SINGH, RAJPUT
47. IC-53563F COL PADAM DEV THAKUR, GARH RIF
48. IC-53587L COL VIJAY NARAYAN SHUKLA, INT
49. IC-54165M COL NAVNEET BAKSHI, SM, MARATHA LI
50. IC-54737H COL ALOK SRIVASTAVA, ASC
51. IC-54874F COL ANIL DEV SWAMI, JAK RIF
52. IC-55212L COL NALINI RANJAN PANDEY, ARTY
53. IC-55867X COL SUNIL BHATT, GR
54. IC-56345N COL HIMANSHU RAWAT, GR
55. IC-57387M COL RISHI YADAVA, AOC
56. IC-57666X COL AJAY KUMAR SHARMA, ARTY
57. IC-57942P COL PRAVIN CHANDRA JOSHI, ARTY
58. IC-58466N COL KULWANT SINGH KUHAD, INT
59. IC-58675L COL RAMNATH SHANKAR, SIKH LI
60. IC-59159H COL MANEESH PARTHSARTHY, GR
61. IC-59464P COL DEEPANKAR DAS, PUNJAB
62. IC-59605Y COL GURKIRAN PAL SINGH, GARH RIF
63. IC-59684Y COL SUDIP MAJEE, SM, BIHAR REGT
64. IC-59898P COL LITTON DHAR, GR 
65. IC-60970M COL V SURESH KUMAR, BIHAR
66. MR-06245M COL ALOK BHALLA, AMC
67. IC-60747H LT COL S VENGATESAN, SIGS
68. MR-07286H LT COL RISHI DHILLAN, AMC
69. NR-19914Y LT COL SUSHMA THOMAS, MNS
70. SL-04681L LT COL NARESH KUMAR, GEN SER
71. IC-66933P MAJ ANUJ SAMAIYA, INT
72. TA-42967K CAPT NEIL SHAJI, INF BN (TA) PARA ATT WITH PARA (SF)
73. TJ-5363N SUB SHEIKH TAHIR, INF BN (TA) JAK LI
74. JC-561673N NB SUB SHOBHA KANT ROY, BIHAR REGT
75. JC-811984K NB SUB RAVINDER SINGH, INT

BAR TO VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-48507Y BRIG DUNDAYYA MALLIKARJUN PURVIMATH, VSM, ENGRS

 

 

 

 

 

MENTION-IN-DESPATCHES

OPERATION MEGHDOOT

1. IC-68691W MAJ PRASHANT DHUKIA, BIHAR

OPERATION RAKSHAK 

1. IC-63962Y LT COL PATIL SHREE VIKAS, INT
2. SS-44871A MAJ SUSHANT KASHYAP, ARMD
3. SS-46035P MAJ VIKAS TYAGI, INT
4. IC-70856H MAJ RAJIV KUMAR, ARTY 
5. IC-73066Y MAJ SIDDHARTHDEO SHARMA, ENGRS
6. IC-73396X MAJ PRANIT SINGH, RAJPUT
7. IC-76405Y MAJ AMAN KUMAR MALIK, SIGS
8. IC-76850X MAJ VINAY KUMAR, ARTY
9. SS-43753A MAJ AMIT KUMAR MISHRA, RAJPUT
10. SL-04897M MAJ SHIV KUMAR, ARTY 
11. SS-45964F CAPT PANKAJ BEHL, ARMD
12. JC-431198Y SUB RANJIV KUMAR, PUNJAB
13. JC-603225L NB SUB HARI KAJI GURUNG, GR
14. 14433932W RHM AJIT KUMAR, ARTY
15. 1494768P HAV GOVINDA BAHADUR KHARKA, ENGRS
16. 3402382K HAV MANJIT SINGH, SIKH
17. 3405930F NK GURPREET SINGH, SIKH 
18. 3408483N NK JASMINDER SINGH, SIKH 
19. 4194971P NK ANAND SINGH, KUMAON
20. 4571905N NK RAMESH ORAON, MAHAR
21. 5048631P NK KAYAR SINGH SARU, GR
22. 5757743H NK BAL BAHADUR PARIYAR, GR
23. 13624678K NK LAL SINGH, PARA (SF)
24. 13769292L NK SUNIL KUMAR, PARA (SF)
25. 5049519P NK DHAN BAHADUR DHENGA, GR
26. 2707505X SEP SUKHVINDER SINGH, GRENADIERS
27. 4287089N SEP PRAFULA KUMAR MALLICK, BIHAR
28. 4487553W SEP SHAMSHER SINGH, SIKH LI
29. 4488153W SEP GURPREET SINGH, SIKH LI
30. 20002892K SEP PRINCE JASWAL, DOGRA
31. 4096814M RFN KUSHAL SINGH, GARH RIF
32. 16020643F RFN PRAVANDH SINGH TOMAR, RAJ RIF
33. 4092077Y PTR LAXMAN SINGH RAWAT, PARA (SF)


No danger of war with India, says Pak PM

NEWDELHI: Pakistan Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi has said there is no danger of a war with India though both countries should ensure there is no escalation of the situation along the Line of Control (LoC) in Kashmir.

Abbasi, who was chosen as the premier by the ruling PML-N after the Supreme Court ousted Nawaz Sharif last year, also ruled out the possibility of action against Lashkar-e-Taiba founder Hafiz Saeed, saying there were no cases against him in Pakistan.

“I don’t think there is a danger of war, at least from our side, it isn’t there. Pakistan has never taken unilateral action, we have always demonstrated responsibility,” Abbasi said in an interview with Geo News channel that was aired on Tuesday night.

Responding to a question on the Indian Army chief’s remarks about calling Pakistan’s “nuclear bluff” and possible cross-border operations, Abbasi said: “The Indian Army chief will not speak in favour of us. It is a fact that Pakistan has nuclear capability and we have demonstrated it, and there is need for India to understand that (when) there are violations of the LoC, these things will not go without retaliation.

Referring to the Indian army chief’s remarks, he said, “If they believe on the other side there will be some political benefits and they keep making statements, as their military leadership has done, this has never been good for peace.”

Asked why no action was taken against Saeed despite pressure from India and the US, Abbasi said: “There is no case against Hafiz Saeed sab in Pakistan. If there was a case, action would be taken. This is an issue that comes to the fore repeatedly but there is no truth in it.”

Abbasi also said there has been no change in Pakistan’s stance that Kashmir remains the “core issue” with India. “We have always said the doors are open for talks but in a dignified and respectable manner, in which there can be meaningful dialogue without compromising on the core issue of Kashmir,” he said.